Posts Tagged With: Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens

Finding the Right Color

A mistake in paint color in February 2014 and a passing remark by a visiting Japanese garden designer from Kyoto lead to a five year effort by Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens to find the right paint color for the wooden bridge.

Historic photos inform present-day decisions: some carpentry details in the railings were missing in recent years. 2019 repairs restored some details

The wooden bridge is an  iconic feature in the century-old tropical Japanese public garden in Hilo Hawaii. It may have been the garden’s first successful fundraising effort.

Charles C. and Laura Kennedy in their yard, Pueo, Hilo, HI circa 1908
(McKay family album, Hawaii State Archives)

Garden booster Laura Kennedy went to her husband C.C. Kennedy in 1917 when he was retired as manager of Waiakea Sugar Mill, and received $1,000.

One source credits a Hilo contractor and landscape designer Mr. Yamamoto with the design and construction of the wooden bridge using that first $1,000. Other stories have the bridge built in Kyoto and shipped over to Hilo to be assembled by Mr. Yamamoto, who came to Hawai`i from Kyoto at the behest of the Kennedys following their tour of Japan in 1914. Yamamoto did the landscaping at Bide-A-Wee, the Kennedy “mountain home” in Volcano village.

unidentified gardener during construction of Lili`uokalani Gardens, possibly Mr. Yamamoto, square roof pavilion at left is to one side of the wooden bridge
(courtesy Lyman Museum archives)

In any event, a wooden bridge has been at that location since Lili`uokalani Gardens was first built.

The railing details still existed during WWII (photo taken 17 December 1944, collection of Hawaii Historic Society)

The tsunami of 1946 brought destruction to the gardens. Restoration went on for several years, mainly in and after 1949 when some funding was obtained from the Territorial Legislature.

Obana family collection courtesy Hawai`i Japanese Center in Hilo

late 1940s postcard, collection of the author

George Mattos in the mid-1970s (courtesy of Eric Mattos)

Up to this point, the bridge had been through several colors including tan, green, brown, and red. When the bridge was painted red, it was a tone of red more toward the orange end of the scale. The stairs were not painted, but the landing was a dark green with a dark red mon inscribed in the center.

Then in 2014, this happened.

February 2014 a very glossy, very bright red was applied to the bridge and pale green to the stairs — note the missing boards in the railing

That fall, a fifth generation Japanese garden designer visited from Kyoto. During a walk through Lili`uokalani Gardens, Takuhiro Yamada of Hanatoyo Landscape crossed this bridge, looked from side to side, shook his head and muttered “Chinese colors.” The hunt was on to find a tone of paint that would be “Shuiro” more suitable for this structure.

Board member Kenji Kuroshima solicited a color sample from one of his guests. They brought calligraphy ink. It couldn’t be matched by any local paint store. A Honolulu Buddhist minister while traveling in Kyoto asked friends to provide a paint sample or formula and Takuhiro Yamada of Hanatoyo Landscape sent a paint formula. No one here could make heads or tails out of the Munsell color system or the formula. Photographs were provided. No paint store can make paint from a photograph. A paint chip was needed.

Shurio paint color formula, courtesy Takuhiro Yamada

Last year Yamada-san provided a paint sample book. Sherwin-Williams in Hilo had a new scanner, which we were tipped to by County painter Alton Nosaka. Everything fell together and the five year search for shuiro was at an end.

A small arrow points to Shuiro, the color of Kenji’s dreams and Takuhiro’s experience

Carpentry repairs were made to include the missing pieces in the railings and primer was applied thanks to Riki Nakano-Domen and Moses Alani Hauanio.

Top image circa 1920, bottom image 16 August 2019 with carpentry complete and primer applied

The barge arrived Friday late afternoon with the paint, which will be mixed and applied Monday — all in time for the 20th annual He Hali`a Aloha No Lili`uokalani, the Queen’s Birthday Festival.

Please come to Lili`uokalani Gardens Saturday, September 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. to celebrate the Queen’s birthday. Live entertainment, mass hula, orchid drop, children’s games and activities, cultural demonstrators, tea ceremony, taiko and more are planned for this free family fun day.

Overflow parking is at Afook-Chinen Civic Center with a shuttle bus running all day.

 

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Board Members Feature: Kenji Kuroshima

Some people dream in color. Kenji Kuroshima is one of those people. In his daily life, Kenji is a photographer with a deep and abiding love for hula.

Kenji at the annual Kamehameha Day Festival on Mokuola in Hilo

He and his wife host many guests, particularly from Japan, and provide guide services to Hawai`i Island locations. Kenji and Michelle are tea practitioners and are deeply involved with Urasenke of Hilo at Shoroan, the tea house in Lili`uokalani Gardens.

Kenji gave a tour of photo locations in Lili`uokalani Gardens for the annual Banyan Drive Art Stroll

Kenji’s “Walking with Poliahu,” a photo of Waihonu reflections with snow-capped Mauna Kea in the background, was selected for inclusion in the 2019 calendar of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens

Kenji also is a member of the Board of Directors of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens. His ideas have guided several events and activities.

It was Kenji’s idea to fly koinobori for Children’s Day, for example. That idea grew this year to include all of Banyan Drive from Suisan Fish Market to Seaside Hotel with the most impressive display on the bridge from Kainehe to Mokuola. This year, Hawaiian fish were included with the Japanese carp windsocks.

Koinobori (carp windsocks) fly from late April to Children’s Day in early May

His guidance for proper maintenance is essential to the restoration of the bamboo thicket. The next volunteer day is Saturday, August 24. Please meet at the bamboo thicket at 8 a.m. and wear closed toe shoes and eye protection. Bring your own gloves. Other tools will be provided.

If you have a home project requiring bamboo poles, you may stop by Banyan Drive starting at 9 a.m. Bring your own saw to cut the poles to size.

Kenji is our bamboo maven who guides the volunteer days in the bamboo thicket, resulting in a healthy patch that sings

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Volunteering is good for your health

Site5Bambooalt

The next volunteer opportunity in Lili`uokalani Gardens will be thinning the bamboo patch on Saturday, August 24, from 8 a.m. to noon. The following article is reproduced from the July newsletter of Blue Zones Hawaii.

Why Volunteering is One of the Most Powerful Things You Can Do for Your Health

By Elisabeth Almekinder, RN, BA, CDE, Health Journalist, Registered Nurse, and Diabetes Educator for the Manos Unidas North Carolina Farmworker Health Program

 

One of the first pieces of advice that Dan Buettner, the founder of Blue Zones, always gives as a way to improve your life, health, and happiness is to sign up to volunteer in your community. It’s a long-term investment in your health and in your city if you sign up to do it regularly, and you’ll meet like-minded people along the way. In Blue Zones Project communities, we use this principle by highlighting local volunteer opportunities and creating opportunities for groups to volunteer together (coworkers, congregation members, students, neighbors). It turns out that helping others benefits our health, just as it benefits those we serve through volunteering. By giving of ourselves, we not only improve our health and happiness. Meeting like-minded people, and creating a new circle of social networks improves our lives and the community as a whole.

Though Erick Zoot Payne, a resident of Charlotte, NC, had made new friends through volunteering at breast cancer awareness events and participating in “ALL IN,” an annual poker tournament to benefit cancer research and care in the Charlotte area, he had never given back to his Alma Mater, St. Andrews University in Laurinburg, NC.

His college experience was uniquely exciting, but he left school with an attitude of, “don’t look back.” When Payne saw the extensive damage caused to the campus by Hurricane Florence in September 2019, a feeling of loss, devastation, and nostalgia came over him. Deeply affected by the photographs he saw online, over the few months following the hurricane, Payne visited St. Andrews twice, wondering what he could do to help. “Another alumnus reached out to a group of us. Music festival swirled around in the conversation, and I knew how I was going to give back to my school. Volunteering to help gave me all this energy I had stored up for a purpose,” said Payne. “I was determined to make this thing happen to show my support for the school, my friends and classmates and all those 18, 19, & 20 somethings who were eating their meals out of food trucks in the gymnasium.”

“Volunteering to help gave me all this energy I had stored up for a purpose.” 

erikzootpayne-volunteering
Erick Zoot Payne, ready to volunteer at SAUL fest.

Through the SAUL Fest experience and working with the other alumni volunteers, Payne saw a love, commitment, and enthusiasm that was contagious. It showed that one person who is passionate about something can make a difference and restore a person’s faith in humanity, but a team of people can regain confidence in the community. That’s a real soul-satisfying experience. Payne now feels a kinship with his new group of volunteer alumni friends that he says affected his soul in an incredibly positive way.  “I was an honor to be a part of SAUL FEST! I was excited, focused, determined, thankful, and appreciative of how hard everyone worked to get it done,” Payne continued. “After it was over, I was exhausted with the biggest smile on my face. It is therapeutic to say how I felt about the whole experience. It came and went, and I had not given much thought to what we did. We raised over $8,000 for hurricane relief for a struggling campus.

Volunteering: Improves Health, Lowers Stress, Boosts Self-Confidence

Volunteering helps because you can see right away the effects of your contribution and commitment. Research has documented the positive feelings that surface during a “helper’s high.”Individuals develop increased trust and social interactions. Participating as a volunteer with others in a group cause boosts self-confidence and decreases the risk of depression, especially in the elderly population.

Lowered levels of stress hormones have been documented in those who volunteer, versus those who don’t. Social benefits include a new network of friends with shared interests and a sense of purpose. At the same time, volunteers learn new skills.

Volunteering has shown to improve mental and physical health in one study of adults over 60. In another study, volunteers reported better physical health and life satisfaction. They perceived volunteering as a catalyst to positive changes in their health.

A longitudinal study of aging found those who volunteer their time to have longer life spans. Participants also experienced a decrease in pain from chronic illness.

If you volunteer, you often get more out of it than you give. It can be an enjoyable experience, such as the music festival Payne helped to organize. Another study showed it to be an excellent tool for driving away loneliness. Blood pressure is lowered, which affects heart health, which may be in part due to the activity causing people to become more active.

Another study concluded that volunteering should be promoted at the public health level through education and policies to improve the health of community members and the community at large. It should primarily be supported in the elderly population, minority groups, those with a low educational level, single folks, or those who are unemployed.

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Send Aloha to Deployed Soldiers

Donated aloha shirts, forever lei, playing cards, and other care package items will be collected by Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens Thursday, July 4, from 7 to 11 a.m. in Lili`uokalani Gardens at the Salute to Veterans fun run.

Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens will join the Salute to Veterans on Thursday, July 4, from 7:00 to 11:00 a.m. During the annual Hilo Bay 5 K sponsored by VFW Post 3830, Friends will accept donations of new or gently used Hawaiian shirts and care package items. These will be sent to the Hawaiian Shirts for Deployed Soldiers non-profit effort that already has sent more than 13,000 shirts in the two years since the mission started.

This is how Gwen Pollard ships out weekly. In two years, the non-profit mission “Hawaiian Shirts for Deployed Soldiers” has sent more than 13,000 shirts.

Any size, men’s or women’s shirt, clean and in good condition will get a thank you note in the pocket and be “Army rolled” for packaging.

Other items of interest to this effort are: thank you notes, packing tape, lip balm, playing cards, forever lei, non-perishable snacks such as macadamia nuts or trail mix, party supplies.

Thank you notes will be available to sign and slip in the pocket of each donated shirt.

If you are unable to deliver your donation to Friends on Lili`uokalani Gardens on Thursday, July 4, from 7 to 11 a.m. then please mail directly to: Hawaiian Shirts for Deployed Soldiers, attn: Gwen Pollard, 217 High Ridge Court, Easley SC 29642.

UPDATE: On July 5, 11 Priority Mail boxes were sent containing 88 shirts, 34 lei, several decks of playing cards, copies of Ke Ola magazine, and packages of macadamia nuts. Another box of freshly laundered shirts was mailed July 6 bringing the donation total from this effort to 94 shirts.

For more information on Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens and future calendar events, please see the July 2019 newsletter.

Newsletter July 2019

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Obon in the Gardens

Here is a link to the flyer for Obon in the Gardens on Saturday, June 1, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

2019 Obon in the Garden

Here is a link to Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens newsletter for June:

Newsletter June 2019

For those of you who may have missed the May newsletter, here is a link:

Newsletter May 2019

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Historic Hawai`i Foundation workshops coming soon

View this email in your browser

 

The workshops are provided in cooperation with
the National Park Service.
Apologies in advance for any cross postings of this email.
Copyright © 2019 HISTORIC HAWAII, All rights reserved.

The Hilo workshop on Monday, June 10, will feature Lili`uokalani Gardens as one of three case studies.

 

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How may I help?

The lifeblood of any successful non-profit community organization is volunteer participation.

pau hana

With Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens in Hilo Hawai`i, we are blessed with supportive residents who feel a kinship to the County park as well as interested visitors, some of whom desire a deeper connection to places they visit.

PondCleaning

Volunteers help clear the pond edge of overgrown sod and decades of muck

In a big garden with maintenance and capital improvements as well as centennial events, there’s always something to do.

Some chores involve getting down and dirty, sweating up a storm, and exercising every muscle in your body.

Other activities require more artistic skill.

Some activities, such as installing a display at a public library or sitting an information table, are slightly more sedate.

No matter what your skill or energy level, Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens can use your help.

Coming up soon are the annual koi nobori event (April 30 through May 5 putting up and taking down fish windsocks on bamboo poles); the annual Hilo Lei Day Festival at Kalakaua Park (Wednesday May 1, information table); the annual AIDS Walk (Saturday May 4, information table); and the annual Hilo Huli sponsored by Rotary Club of South Hilo (Sunday May 5, information table). If you are able to help with any of these events, contact K.T. Cannon-Eger by email at kteger@hawaii.rr.com

In June, the annual Obon in the Gardens (Saturday June 1) could use set up and craft help. Contact chairman Jane Heit by email at bonqueen@gmail.com

 

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Koi Nobori to fly at Waiakea Peninsula

This is the dream — some day there will be an abundance of koi nobori

Several years ago, Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens board member Kenji Kuroshima had this dream of flying koi nobori in the park for Boy’s Day (May 5). We don’t have the abundance of his dream — yet. With your help, Friends hope to increase the number of koi nobori this year.

This was the reality last year — two koi nobori on each pole. More will fly this year from Tuesday, April 30, through Sunday, May 5.

In Japan, koi nobori fly from April through early May to celebrate Children’s Day (Kodomo No Hi), a national holiday changed in 1948 to honor both boys and girls. Koi is a type of carp symbolizing courage and strength.

Bamboo poles are harvested near Hirano Store on the Volcano Highway and each year are donated to local fishermen at the end of the display through the assistance of Suisan Fish Market.

Koi nobori will be attached to freshly cut bamboo poles on Tuesday, April 30. Assembly area is adjacent to the parking lot at Mokuola, just off Lihiwai Street in Hilo.

Many hands are needed for this annual activity. If you have koi nobori to donate or wish to help with assembly and placement of the poles, please meet Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, April 30.

koi nobori on the Mokuola bridge

Koi nobori may be viewed at Suisan Fish Market, Hilo Bay Cafe, Pandamonia’s Paleta Palace, Shoroan, Lili`uokalani Gardens, Banyan Gallery, Hilo Hawaiian Hotel, Grand Naniloa Resort, and across the bridge to Mokuola.

The bamboo poles remain in place through the annual Rotary Club of South Hilo fundraiser Hilo Huli on Sunday, May 5.

the annual Rotary Club of South Hilo event funds scholarships and grants in our island community

Here is a link to the Rotary Club of South Hilo page on Facebook and the event where you may order tickets.

https://www.facebook.com/events/2032112833571426/

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April news

Banyan Gallery has a few 2019 calendars left. Funds raised support Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens.

Last week, turning the page on the 2019 calendar, I was met with delight at the sight of one of my photos selected by photo contest judge Mary Goodrich. What a glorious morning that was. I was on the sixth floor of the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel and got up early to prepare for a garden workshop.

looking toward Mokuola from the 6th floor of the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel around 6 a.m. (photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger)

Banyan Gallery carries the few remaining calendars and now has a limited edition Yoshirt with this photograph. Proceeds benefit Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens.

Women’s shirt in medium or large; photo is embedded in the fabric and won’t wash out or fade; dries quickly, great for travel

The calendar was prepared late last summer. We tried to include as many dates of events in Hilo as we could find. Some dates have changed since the calendar was printed.

April calendar page featured photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger

Notable is the 8th annual AIDS Walk listed on the calendar as Saturday, April 13. The actual date of this fundraiser is Saturday, May 4, in Lili`uokalani Gardens. The registration table opens at 8 a.m.

Annual fundraising walk where all the money raised stays on this island.

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Training opportunities in Portland, OR and Hilo, HI

Are you looking for an opportunity to enhance your Japanese landscape skills?

Portland Japanese Garden offers an amazing opportunity to learn stone setting, bamboo fence construction, and other skills including tools, aesthetics, and history.

Deadline for the beginner’s course is today (February 15) with the course set for June 3-9. Intermediate level deadline is in April with the course set for September 16-27. More details and registration at the link below:

https://mailchi.mp/341f7b900706/the-center-334425?e=d24afc77b0

Meanwhile, in Hilo a pruning class will be taught by Dennis Makishima in Lili`uokalani Gardens Tuesday and Wednesday, March 19 and 20. Advance registration is required. The course is geared toward public park maintenance personnel, Master Gardeners, and active landscape industry workers.

Registration for this workshop is closed with 50 registrants and a small waiting list. No more registrants can be accommodated.
More workshops will be held in the future. Register early.

UPDATE: As of Monday, February 25, class registration is full with 50 participants. There is a small waiting list.

Dennis demonstrates how to handle black pine in a tropical climate.
photo by Bill F. Eger 2011

Dennis is the founder of the Merritt College (Oakland, California) aesthetic tree pruning program. He is a past president of the Golden State Bonsai Federation. Dennis used to come to Hawaii annually to help with the bonsai show at the Okinawa Festival in Honolulu.

Now he says he’s retired, but Dennis is coming to Hawaii in March to work on clients’ trees over two weekends on Oahu. In between, Dennis will return to Hilo to teach pruning workshops to County park maintenance personnel, local landscapers, and Master Gardeners. Registration in advance is required for the two-day workshop Tuesday and Wednesday, March 19 and 20.

“Several Sister City trees have been planted since the last time Dennis visited,” K.T. Cannon-Eger of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens noted. “They are in need of pruning so it’s a good time to share these skills with others.”

His pruning career started in 1980 when he was working for a produce store in Berkeley. He and a plumber friend traded labor and Dennis pruned his first black pine tree. Over the years, Dennis studied urban horticulture and developed multi-year plans to work on clients trees.

While taking a horticulture class at Merritt College, a team project tackled the pruning of a maple tree on campus. Student interest led to the formation of an aesthetic pruning series as well as a continuing organization that offers a certification program.

“His teaching and leadership made it possible for pruners to make a living at aesthetically pruning trees,” said Randall Lee, president of the Aesthetic Pruners Association. Lee said he learned under Makishima starting around 1988 and said he would not have been an aesthetic pruner without him. Lee said many pruners now advertise themselves as aesthetic pruners, and his organization, founded 10 years ago, was started to certify and support them. The association’s website lists 77 affiliated pruners throughout the United States.

“I was fortunate to meet Dennis at a North American Japanese Garden Association conference. He expressed an interest in Lili`uokalani Gardens and two years later he managed a side trip to Hilo during which 20 County maintenance personnel and Master Gardeners took hands-on workshops with Dennis.”

The two-day workshop will be held in Lili`uokalani Gardens Tuesday and Wednesday, March 19 and 20, from 7:45 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. each day rain or shine. Lunch, refreshments, and workshop materials are included in the $15 registration cost. Meet at the old sumo ring, a shelter near the tea house and parking lot off Banyan Drive.

To reserve a space, contact K.T. Cannon-Eger at kteger@hawaii.rr.com or phone (808) 895-8130.

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