Author Archives: usjapanesegardens

About usjapanesegardens

Enthusiastic supporter of Japanese gardens; founding member of the North American Japanese Garden Association; member of the board of directors of Japanese Gardening dot org ; loves travel and photography

October newsletter features September photos

So much happened in Lili`uokalani Gardens that it was a challenge to keep the monthly newsletter to four pages.

Here is a link to a PDF of that newsletter which includes a calendar of coming events on page two.

Newsletter October 2019

In subsequent blog entries, more photos of the 20th annual He Hali`a Aloha No Lili`uokalani will be published as well as more photos of the floral design workshop that provided three sites for wedding vow renewals in the gardens.

 

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Save the Date 12/3/2019

Giving Tuesday is an international day of giving to community and non-profit events and activities in the form of physical support or monetary donations.

This year, special events for young people have been added. Please share this with the young people and organizations you know.

Hello, Fellow Kids!

Announcing the Launch of #GivingTuesdayKids!

With youth shaking up and spearheading many of the major movements on key issues facing our world today, from climate change to healthcare to student debt, GivingTuesday is helping amplify the next generation of young leaders to be organizers, thought-leaders, and campaign managers for a more generous world. We’re so thrilled to announce the official launch of #GivingTuesdayKids

Led by 12-year-old Khloe Thompson and a team of youth ambassadors, #GivingTuesdayKids is all about encouraging young people to take action around the causes they care about most on GivingTuesday. On December 3, 2019, kids all over the world will lead volunteer projects, acts of kindness, and epic givebacks, proving that everyone has the power to make change in their communities and that everyone has something to give.
Join the Movement

Help Spread the Word!

Please share with the young people in your life, your clients, program participants, partner organizations and anyone you think might help us grow this movement!

  • Share our video on your personal and organization’s social media channels
  • Share in any relevant Facebook groups you’re a part of
  • Share with your local school district (there’s a toolkit and curriculum for teachers!)
  • Forward this email to colleagues and friends

Here are some sample tweets, social media posts, and logos and here’s the Participation Guide for Youth and Families.

We simply could not be more thrilled to help launch this movement for young changemakers! As always, we’d love to hear your ideas for how to get the word out and who we should be talking to – email us anytime (just hit reply on this email).

The GivingTuesdayTeam

Copyright © 2019 GivingTuesday, All rights reserved.
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Annual Photography Contest

Call to Photographers_2020

UPDATE: The original entry form was found to contain an error. The deadline is extended to Monday September 30, 2019 not 2018. A corrected entry form link is immediately above this paragraph. Mahalo.

Joy in the Gardens is the theme for the fourth annual Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens photography contest. The link above will provide you with a printable entry form and further details.

Lili`uokalani Gardens is composed of four parks: the original Japanese-style landscape nicknamed Nihon Koen bounded by Banyan Drive and Lihiwai Street, Moku Ola (Coconut Island), Rakuen, and Isles.

Selected Photographs of the Gardens will be featured in the 4th Annual Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens Photo Calendar.

Jelena Clay holds the 2018 calendar at Banyan Gallery

Proceeds from calendar sales will help fund the work of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens to improve and beautify the park. There is no entry fee for this contest. Number of entries is limited to six (6).

Vijaykarai1953@gmail.com

Images should be JPEG sized to 2000 pixels on the longest side. Name the image file with the name of your entry and your initials. Example: Title_of_your_work _HL.jpg

April 2019 calendar page featured photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger
The calendar contains dates of Hilo events for 13 months

Photographers whose images are selected for inclusion in the calendar will be asked to provide a full resolution file for printing and a signed release that grants the Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens one time use of the image in the 2020 calendar and any current or future use for promotion of calendar.

Photographers retain all rights to their images.

Questions about the contest can be emailed to contest chairman Vijay Karai // Vijaykarai1953@gmail.com

The entries will be selected by professional photographer, Charles Wood.

Charles Wood is a commercial photographer with more than 30 years in the field.

Important dates:

Submission Deadline: 5 p.m. Wednesday September 25, 2018

Notification of Acceptance:  Thursday October 3, 2018

Submission of hi-resolution images by Monday October 7, 2018

Calendar printed by early November, 2019

Fourth Annual Banyan Drive Art Stroll with photographers’ exhibition

Saturday January 11, 2020 noon to 6 p.m.

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

News from Portland OR: Fall Training and Haiku in the Classroom

“Haiku is not a shriek, a howl, a sigh, or a yawn; rather, it is the deep breath of life.”

― Santōka Taneda, Mountain Tasting: Haiku and Journals of Santoka Taneda

KEY DATES

September 12
Deadline for applications for October design intensive

September 16 – 27
Waza to Kokoro Intermediate Level Seminar

October 22 – 24
With an eye towards nature: A Japanese garden design intensive

Garden+ Lecture Series

2019 lectures complete; 2020 lectures to be announced this fall.

Image by Parkrose student in Haiku Alive program
Welcoming Waza to Kokoro Participants
This month we welcome landscape practitioners from across the country and Australia for the intermediate-level Waza to Kokoro: Hands and Heart training seminar in Japanese garden arts.  Watch this space next month for 2020’s seminar dates!Fall Design Intensive: Application Deadline Extended
Application has been extended through Sept. 12 for “With an Eye Towards Nature: A Japanese Garden Design Intensive.” Created for design
professionals and taught by Garden staff including Garden Curator Sadafumi Uchiyama, the short course takes place at Portland Japanese Garden and includes an overnight in the Columbia Gorge at the stunning Menucha Retreat Center. It’s eligible for continuing education units for the Association of Professional Landscape Designers and other professional organizations as well.
Learn More & Apply
Bring Haiku Alive to Your Classroom or Home!

Haiku Alive — our school outreach program teaching the Japanese cultural value of living in harmony with nature through focusing on poetic tradition — has reached more than a thousand under-served elementary school students since its inception in 2011. We’re pleased to announce that the program will begin its ninth season with a new face — educator, poet and visual artist Anne Paris will succeeds the retiring Joan Kvitka, who created the program nearly a decade ago.

“Nature teaches us how to live. My study of haiku, as well as my own practice as a writer and a teacher, has taught me how valuable this compressed form, along with the observation of the natural world, can be in gaining understanding about our own inner state. I can see that students who participate in the Haiku Alive program have also discovered the power of this poetic form, as well as the power of observation in nature.”

Haiku Alive is a partnership with Parkrose School District and Park Academy. But starting this month, anyone can bring the Haiku Alive learning experience into their classroom or home! Haiku Alive’s curriculum outline, presentations, and worksheets are now available to download for free.

Explore Teaching Materials
>From the Archives

Take a deep breath and see the Garden anew through the curious eyes of Haiku Alive students with this article published in the Garden’s magazine last year.

ABOUT THE TRAINING CENTER
The International Japanese Garden Training Center teaches traditional skills and techniques for creating and fostering Japanese gardens — while acquainting learners with the garden’s cultural heart and soul. Workshops, seminars, and lectures take place at the Garden and offsite venues. Visiting and permanent faculty include Portland Japanese Garden staff and practitioners, designers, and academics from the U.S., Japan, and other countries. The Center, the only such program in the world outside of Japan, is a recipient of a 2018 Program of Excellence Award from the American Public Gardens Association.
QUESTIONS?
To learn more, contact the Training Center’s Director Kristin Faurest at kfaurest@japanesegarden.org
Training Center Quick Links
Watch a Video
Waza to Kokoro
Garden+ Lecture Series
Copyright © 2019 Portland Japanese Garden, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is:
Portland Japanese Garden

611 SW Kingston Ave

Portland, OR 97205-5886

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Celebrate the Queen’s birthday Saturday September 7

The 20th annual He Hali`a Aloha No Lili`uokalani is Saturday, September 7

Newsletter September 2019

Here is the link to Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens newsletter for the month of September 2019.

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Finding the Right Color

A mistake in paint color in February 2014 and a passing remark by a visiting Japanese garden designer from Kyoto lead to a five year effort by Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens to find the right paint color for the wooden bridge.

Historic photos inform present-day decisions: some carpentry details in the railings were missing in recent years. 2019 repairs restored some details

The wooden bridge is an  iconic feature in the century-old tropical Japanese public garden in Hilo Hawaii. It may have been the garden’s first successful fundraising effort.

Charles C. and Laura Kennedy in their yard, Pueo, Hilo, HI circa 1908
(McKay family album, Hawaii State Archives)

Garden booster Laura Kennedy went to her husband C.C. Kennedy in 1917 when he was retired as manager of Waiakea Sugar Mill, and received $1,000.

One source credits a Hilo contractor and landscape designer Mr. Yamamoto with the design and construction of the wooden bridge using that first $1,000. Other stories have the bridge built in Kyoto and shipped over to Hilo to be assembled by Mr. Yamamoto, who came to Hawai`i from Kyoto at the behest of the Kennedys following their tour of Japan in 1914. Yamamoto did the landscaping at Bide-A-Wee, the Kennedy “mountain home” in Volcano village.

unidentified gardener during construction of Lili`uokalani Gardens, possibly Mr. Yamamoto, square roof pavilion at left is to one side of the wooden bridge
(courtesy Lyman Museum archives)

In any event, a wooden bridge has been at that location since Lili`uokalani Gardens was first built.

The railing details still existed during WWII (photo taken 17 December 1944, collection of Hawaii Historic Society)

The tsunami of 1946 brought destruction to the gardens. Restoration went on for several years, mainly in and after 1949 when some funding was obtained from the Territorial Legislature.

Obana family collection courtesy Hawai`i Japanese Center in Hilo

late 1940s postcard, collection of the author

George Mattos in the mid-1970s (courtesy of Eric Mattos)

Up to this point, the bridge had been through several colors including tan, green, brown, and red. When the bridge was painted red, it was a tone of red more toward the orange end of the scale. The stairs were not painted, but the landing was a dark green with a dark red mon inscribed in the center.

Then in 2014, this happened.

February 2014 a very glossy, very bright red was applied to the bridge and pale green to the stairs — note the missing boards in the railing

That fall, a fifth generation Japanese garden designer visited from Kyoto. During a walk through Lili`uokalani Gardens, Takuhiro Yamada of Hanatoyo Landscape crossed this bridge, looked from side to side, shook his head and muttered “Chinese colors.” The hunt was on to find a tone of paint that would be “Shuiro” more suitable for this structure.

Board member Kenji Kuroshima solicited a color sample from one of his guests. They brought calligraphy ink. It couldn’t be matched by any local paint store. A Honolulu Buddhist minister while traveling in Kyoto asked friends to provide a paint sample or formula and Takuhiro Yamada of Hanatoyo Landscape sent a paint formula. No one here could make heads or tails out of the Munsell color system or the formula. Photographs were provided. No paint store can make paint from a photograph. A paint chip was needed.

Shurio paint color formula, courtesy Takuhiro Yamada

Last year Yamada-san provided a paint sample book. Sherwin-Williams in Hilo had a new scanner, which we were tipped to by County painter Alton Nosaka. Everything fell together and the five year search for shuiro was at an end.

A small arrow points to Shuiro, the color of Kenji’s dreams and Takuhiro’s experience

Carpentry repairs were made to include the missing pieces in the railings and primer was applied thanks to Riki Nakano-Domen and Moses Alani Hauanio.

Top image circa 1920, bottom image 16 August 2019 with carpentry complete and primer applied

The barge arrived Friday late afternoon with the paint, which will be mixed and applied Monday — all in time for the 20th annual He Hali`a Aloha No Lili`uokalani, the Queen’s Birthday Festival.

Please come to Lili`uokalani Gardens Saturday, September 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. to celebrate the Queen’s birthday. Live entertainment, mass hula, orchid drop, children’s games and activities, cultural demonstrators, tea ceremony, taiko and more are planned for this free family fun day.

Overflow parking is at Afook-Chinen Civic Center with a shuttle bus running all day.

UPDATE: The finished bridge with dark green steps:

after Kenji-IMG_3743

photo courtesy of Kenji Kuroshima

Moon Gate KT-IMG_4382

Moon Gate floral design by Alison Higgins of Grace Flowers Hawai`​i in Honoka`a for a wedding vow renewal event 8 September 2019; photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger

All comments are monitored before posting.

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

Board Members Feature: Kenji Kuroshima

Some people dream in color. Kenji Kuroshima is one of those people. In his daily life, Kenji is a photographer with a deep and abiding love for hula.

Kenji at the annual Kamehameha Day Festival on Mokuola in Hilo

He and his wife host many guests, particularly from Japan, and provide guide services to Hawai`i Island locations. Kenji and Michelle are tea practitioners and are deeply involved with Urasenke of Hilo at Shoroan, the tea house in Lili`uokalani Gardens.

Kenji gave a tour of photo locations in Lili`uokalani Gardens for the annual Banyan Drive Art Stroll

Kenji’s “Walking with Poliahu,” a photo of Waihonu reflections with snow-capped Mauna Kea in the background, was selected for inclusion in the 2019 calendar of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens

Kenji also is a member of the Board of Directors of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens. His ideas have guided several events and activities.

It was Kenji’s idea to fly koinobori for Children’s Day, for example. That idea grew this year to include all of Banyan Drive from Suisan Fish Market to Seaside Hotel with the most impressive display on the bridge from Kainehe to Mokuola. This year, Hawaiian fish were included with the Japanese carp windsocks.

Koinobori (carp windsocks) fly from late April to Children’s Day in early May

His guidance for proper maintenance is essential to the restoration of the bamboo thicket. The next volunteer day is Saturday, August 24. Please meet at the bamboo thicket at 8 a.m. and wear closed toe shoes and eye protection. Bring your own gloves. Other tools will be provided.

If you have a home project requiring bamboo poles, you may stop by Banyan Drive starting at 9 a.m. Bring your own saw to cut the poles to size.

Kenji is our bamboo maven who guides the volunteer days in the bamboo thicket, resulting in a healthy patch that sings

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Training opportunity in Portland Oregon

Application Deadline On August 20
Application is open until this Tuesday, Aug. 20 for With an Eye Towards Nature: A Japanese Garden Design Intensive.

Created for design professionals and taught by Garden staff including Garden Curator Sadafumi Uchiyama, this new short intensive course takes place October 22-24, 2019 at Portland Japanese Garden and offsite in the Columbia Gorge including an overnight at the stunning Menucha Retreat Center.

The course is eligible for 16 continuing education credits for members of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers and is eligible for CEUs or professional development credits for other organizations as well. Installment plans are available for tuition fee.

Questions? Contact us at thecenter@japanesegarden.org

LEARN MORE
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Mystery of Okame origin solved

British book cover and title

Through a series of wonderful coincidences, this book came to my attention while traveling in and around London in May. When I got on the plane to come home, I took it out of my backpack. By the time I got to Chicago, I’d read 170 pages. It’s a real page-turner, as they say.

The guide on our 18-person Back Roads Tour came to realize just how obsessed I am with Japanese gardens. Some of her dear friends in Kent happened to live in the cottage on Ingram’s estate so she had the driver pull a 10 minute detour to Benenden so we could go past “Cherry” Ingram’s home. She couldn’t reach her friends so we didn’t get to stop, but later in the gift shop at Wisley RBG, Harriet came up to me with this book and insisted I buy it.

The author Naoko Abe wrote it in Japanese. In 2016, “her biography of Collingwood Ingram won the prestigious Nihon Essayist Club Award” (from the book cover). Recently she rewrote the book in English with additional material.

When I got to Denver Botanic Gardens in early June, I wandered through the Japanese garden with Ebi Kondo. We got to talking about cherry trees and I asked, “Have you ever heard of Cherry Ingram?” He replied “I’m reading that book right now.”

U.S. book cover and title

The book solved one mystery Friends of Lil`u okalani Gardens: the origin of “Okame.” Three years before our centennial began, we experimented with “Pink Cloud” and “Okame” here on Hawaii Island. Bare root plants were obtained from L.E. Cooke Nursery in Southern California, which ceased shipping bare root cherry trees two years ago. A few of the imported trees remain potted in Hilo at Mountain Meadows Nursery in Pana`ewa.

Everyone knew that Pink Cloud had been hybridized at the Huntington, but nobody knew the back story on Okame.

hybridized at The Huntington more than 40 years ago, Pink Cloud was one variety tested by Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens

from page 159-160:

“In the early 1940s, forsaking Sargent cherry, Ingram decided to cross-pollinate two other wild species: Taiwan (Kanhi-zakura) and Fuji (Mame-zakura). Taiwan cherries thrived in the tropical climate of Japan’s southern islands of Okinawa. Meanwhile, the hardy white-blossomed Fuji bloomed about 1,000 miles to the north, around the mountain for which it was named. To make the task more difficult, Taiwan cherries bloomed in February and Fuji in April. Ingraham hoped to create a small but sturdy new flower, with deep-pink blossoms, out of the two distant and distinct species.

“The only problem was that he didn’t have any Taiwan cherries at the time. One place that did was the Temperate House at Kew Gardens. So there, late one February, Ingram shook the pollen from the Taiwan cherry’s ripe anthers onto tissue paper, folded them carefully and placed them in a Thermos flask with a pinch of calcium chloride at the bottom to absorb any humidity. By keeping the pollen dry and stored at an even temperature, he was able to preserve it for nine weeks until the late-flowering Fuji was ready to be fertilised. At last, Taiwan and Fuji produced a beautiful offspring.

“Ingram named his creation Okame, after a Japanese goddess of good fortune and mirth. Its flowers bloomed each March, at the midpoint between the blossoming of the Taiwan and Fuji cherries. Each tree was bedecked in countless little petals, like stars in the night sky. Each bloom was tiny and delicate, taking after the maternal Fuji cherry. But each was also tinted a light pink by the mix of the two parents’ shades. Better still, the sepals that supported the petals were a deep vibrant pink. Ingram said the flower would ‘be appreciated by all who have an eye for elegance of form and unpretentious beauty.’ He was ecstatic. ‘The offspring of this union has more than fulfilled my expectations,’ he wrote.”

Okame image from Naoko Abe’s biography of Collingwood Ingram

Okame image from Naoko Abe’s biography of Collingwood Ingram

Much more than solving our little plant origin mystery, this book delights with stories interconnecting some of the greats in the annals of garden history: Maryanne North, Vita Sackville West, Charles Sprague Sargent of the Arnold Arboretum, Roland Jefferson of the U.S. National Arboretum, Seisaku Funatsu, Masuhiko Kayama, and many more.

The main story is of Cherry Ingram’s collection of cherries from Japan and throughout England, preserving varieties that would go extinct in Japan. He returned Taihaku (also known as Akatsuki), presumed extinct in Japan, to the 16th Toemon Sano in 1932.

Here is a link to a more polished review of “The Sakura Obsession” as the biography is titled in the United States.

https://www.plinthetal.com/blog-1/2019/4/7/naoko-abes-the-sakura-obsession

 

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Helpful sites, beautiful sights

In searching for information about Japanese gardens in the United States, I came across the Japanese Gardening Organization in 2012. A delightful fellowship developed as my husband and I visited several gardens I found through members of the Board of Directors.

(from 2012 visit) Bob Brackman, executive director, explains plans for the future of the San Antonio Botanical Garden to K.T. and Don in the azumaya completed in the 2005 renovation of Kumamoto En.
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

The web site of JGO developed into a photo-rich delight to the senses.

http://www.japanesegardening.org/site/

With the addition of chapters from Andrew Dean’s Complete Japanese Garden Handbook, the site has become information rich too.

Please give it a look.

 

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