Arizona

Coming soon: hands-on learning in Arizona

Promoting the Art, Craft and Heart of Japanese gardens in the USA and Canada.

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL

at the Japanese Friendship Garden of Phoenix

Register for NAJGA’s next Regional workshop and enjoy Phoenix in the winter! With average temperatures in the 70’s, Phoenix is an ideal place to spend President’s Day weekend. Our two-day Regional (February 14 & 15), hosted by the Japanese Friendship Garden of Phoenix, Ro Ho En, will feature hands-on learning as well as the opportunity to learn about several traditional Japanese arts. Learn to build a stepping stone path, a sleeve fence and water basin, plant pines and place stones. The program will also include ikebana, tea ceremony, and taiko demonstrations. Lunch is included on both days and will be served in the Garden. Saturday dinner in the Garden and a Sunday tour of Phoenix’s Desert Botanical Garden and Taliesin West at the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation will be offered as optional add-ons.

Register today at www.najga.org/events

Phoenix, Arizona’s Japanese Friendship Garden has strengthened ties with their Sister City Himeji. Adjacent to the famous Himeji castle is Koko-en, a collection of nine gardens built in 1992 in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the municipality. The walled gardens cover approximately 8.65 acres. Koko-en was designed by Professor Makoto Nakamura of Kyoto University. The garden was built by Hanatoyo Landscape of Kyoto.

Ro Ho En was a cooperative effort between Himeji and Phoenix.

1987: Delegation from Himeji, Japan proposed that a Japanese Friendship Garden be constructed in the Central City.

1990: City of Himeji Landscape Architects visited Phoenix to present the design for the Japanese Friendship Garden.

2000: Completion of construction of the Japanese Friendship Garden.

2002: Garden opened to Public.

[information from the Ro Ho En web site ]
https://www.japanesefriendshipgarden.org/

 

Categories: Arizona, Phoenix | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Learning opportunities in Phoenix and Portland

NEXT NAJGA REGIONAL
The next North American Japanese Garden Association Regional has been scheduled!
It will be held Friday, February 14 and Saturday, February 15 at
the Japanese Friendship Garden of Phoenix, Ro Ho En.

More information will soon be available.

2020 SAVE THE DATES

FOR PROFESSIONAL TRAINING IN JAPANESE GARDEN ARTS
AT PORTLAND JAPANESE GARDEN

Waza to Kokoro: Hands and Heart, Level 1

This intensive, hands-on educational seminar is an immersive learning experience in Japanese garden arts, framed in the Culture of Tea and the art form of the tea garden. Come to Portland to learn stone setting, plant care, design, history and other related subjects directly from Japanese garden masters.  The course is designed for landscape practitioners from all disciplines.

Location:
Portland Japanese Garden and offsites

Dates:

June 8-14 (application opens Jan. 10, 2020)

Aug. 24-30, 2020 (application opens March 10, 2020)

With an Eye Towards Nature: A Japanese Garden Design Intensive

This three-day course created for design professionals focuses on the Japanese tradition of designing with nature, using the spectacular landscape of the Columbia Gorge as an outdoor classroom. Marc Treib, professor of architecture emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, and a noted landscape and architectural historian and critic, takes part in the last day’s design critique and gives a public talk the next day.

Dates: April 25-27 (application opens Feb. 1, 2020)

Tuition, conditions, program content and other details at japanesegarden.org/thecenter or from  kfaurest@japanesegarden.org
The Training Center is a recipient of the 2018 American Public Gardens Association award for program excellence.

Categories: Arizona, Oregon, Portland | Tags: | Leave a comment

What else has been in the garden?

coyote track

Tracks of wildlife are not uncommon at Sansho-en, the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Japanese Garden at Chicago Botanic Gardens in Glencoe, IL. This coyote track was found one morning near the shoin house.

What’s in your garden when you aren’t looking? Gardeners have to deal with more than the occasional insect infestation or small children climbing on stones.

Perhaps the coyote at Sansho-en was hunting something like the rabbits I noticed all over the lawn at Marston House in San Diego.

Late one afternoon, rabbits covered the lawns at Marsden House in San Diego at the upper end of Balboa Park.

Late one afternoon, rabbits covered the lawns at Marston House in San Diego at the upper end of Balboa Park.

Birds seem to cause the most difficulty for gardens with ponds, especially birds that eat koi like a heron at Fort Worth and another at San Antonio’s Sunken Gardens at Brackenridge Park.

photo by Bill F. Eger

Focused, this fast beak scooped up several small fish from the pond at Sunken Garden in San Antonio.

goose

A wary goose halted momentarily at the end of the path near the plum viewing arbor at Missouri Botanical Garden. Geese leave behind copious amounts of waste making paths into minefields.

mallards

Ducks join koi in the pond at Ro Ho En in Phoenix, competing for food.

But of all the critters we came across, furry or feathered or two-legged, the smallest seemed to cause the most problems. My husband was unfamiliar with squirrels and chipmunks and was taking a lot of photographs. Horticulturist Benjamin Carroll at Sansho-en noticed this and commented that Bill “wouldn’t find them so cute when you see the damage they do.”

This bold fellow owned the path at the Anderson Japanese Garden in Rockford IL.

This bold fellow owned the path at the Anderson Japanese Garden in Rockford IL.

NYC squirrel

Waterfront squirrel in between Battery Park and the wharves in New York City

Photos in this blog otherwise uncredited are by K.T. Cannon-Eger.

Categories: Arizona, Glencoe, Illinois, Missouri, Rockford, San Antonio, St. Louis, Texas | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America arrives on bookshelves worldwide

cover photo by David Cobb of the hexagonal yukimi style lantern at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle

cover photo by David Cobb of the hexagonal yukimi style lantern at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle

A new look at Japanese gardens in North America — Quiet Beauty — provides the viewing public with detailed information and delightful photographs on 26 peaceful places across the continental United States and into Canada.

Author Kendall H. Brown is a professor of Asian art history at California State University Long Beach. Photographer David M. Cobb is a member of the North American Nature Photography Association, Garden Writers Association, and Professional Photographers of America.

Released by the esteemed publishing house Tuttle Publishing, this beautiful book offers history and invites thoughtfulness on how these gardens came to be and what they offer to us now. Insightful text is accompanied by more than 180 stunning color photographs and a few reproductions of antique postal cards.

In the introduction — Places to Dream — Dr. Brown notes, “Japanese gardens or, more accurately, Japanese-style gardens, in North America offer distinct pleasures. In contrast to the cacophony of cities, the anonymity of suburbs, and even the anxiety of deserts or forests, these gardens can provide beautifully controlled environments. In artful landscapes we lose ourselves in a path woven around a pond and a harmonious stone arrangement; we delight in the variegated colors of graceful koi and the bright hues of blossoming plums; and we are calmed by a stream’s gentle murmur and the dappled greens of moss. Another kind of pleasure is contextual and social rather than sensory and psychological. Japanese gardens in North America are often found where we least expect them, and in places unknown in pre-modern Japan. Thus we feel a special delight in discovering a ‘dry garden’ of stones and sand at a museum, a lush pond garden on a college campus, or a waterfall-fed stream garden in a hospital. Those familiar with gardens in Japan may also enjoy Japanese-style gardens intellectually, noting creative plant substitutions or thoughtful ways of interpreting Japanese design principles within distinctly North American spaces.”

Dr. Brown takes three eras posited by garden historian Makoto Suzuki of the Nodai Institute, professor at Tokyo University of Agriculture, and expands them to five: the age of world fairs and expositions, building bridges, innovation by adaptation, expansive visions and traditions transformed.

During the past ten years. I have read many articles by Ken Brown and have heard him speak at several conferences. I serve on the editorial board of the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA) which editorial board he chairs. In person, I can verify that Dr. Brown delivers a substantial amount of information in a short amount of time — all of it masterfully accompanied by photographs, post cards, newspaper clippings and other visual aids along with a good sense of humor and split second timing. There are times I have felt he is delivering information faster than I can absorb it so I am delighted to have such a beautiful volume I can savor at leisure.

I have a special appreciation for David Cobb’s photographs. My husband and I have been to many of the places depicted and know what it takes to get the perfect image of that spot. So many of Cobb’s shots are truly breathtaking.

back cover photo by David Cobb of the Japanese garden at Fort Worth Botanic Garden in Texas

back cover photo by David Cobb of the Japanese garden at Fort Worth Botanic Garden in Texas

Gardens featured in Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America are:

the Japanese Tea Garden in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco California 1894;

Japanese Garden at the Huntington Botanic Garden, San Marino California 1911 (also 1968, 2011);

Maymont Japanese Garden, Richmond Virginia, 1911 (1977);

Japanese Hill and Pond Garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, New York 1915;

Hakone Estate and Garden, Saratoga California 1918;

Shofuso Japanese House and Garden, Philadelphia Pennsylvania 1958;

Japanese Garden at the Washington Park Arboretum, Seattle Washington 1960;

Nitobe Memorial Garden at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver B.C. Canada 1960;

Japanese Garden at the Blodel Reserve, Bainbridge Island, Washington 1961 (1978, 1986);

Portland Japanese Garden, Portland Oregon 1963;

Japanese Garden in San Mateo Central Park, San Mateo California 1965;

Nikka-Yuko Japanese Garden, Lethbridge, Alberta 1966;

Nishinomiya Garden in Mani to Park, Spokane Washington 1974;

Japanese Garden in the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, Fort Worth Texas 1973;

Shomu’en at Cheekwood, Nashville Tennessee 1990;

Seiwa’en at the Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis Missouri 1977;

Sansho’en at Chicago Botanic Garden, Glencoe Illinois 1982;

Shofu’en at the Denver Botanic Gardens, Denver Colorado 1979;

Suiho’en at the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant, Van Nuys California 1984;

Seisuitei at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chanhassen Minnesota 1985 (1996);

Anderson Japanese Gardens, Rockford Illinois 1978;

Japanese Garden at the Montreal Botanical Garden, Montreal Quebec 1988;

Tenshin’en at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Massachusetts 1988;

Roji’en in the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach Florida 2001;

R0ho’en in Margaret T. Hance Park, Phoenix Arizona 2002; and

Garden of the Pine Wind at Garven Woodland Gardens, Hot Springs Arkansas 2001.

Marvelous additions in the appendices include garden contacts and a select bibliography including books, journals and websites plus a listing of 75 important Japanese gardens in North America, five of which are in the state of Hawaii.

The Hawaii gardens appearing in this list include:

the Cultural Gardens at Honolulu International Airport 1967;

Imin (East West) Center at the University of Hawaii-Manoa 1963 (teahouse 1972);

Byodo’in Gardens, Kaneohe Oahu 1968;

Japanese Garden and Teahouse at Kepaniwai Park, Wailuku Maui 1968 (teahouse 1972); and

Lili`uokalani Gardens, Hilo Hawai`i (1917).

December 17, 1944 from the library of the Hawaiian Historical Society

Lili`uokalani Gardens on December 17, 1944 from the library of the Hawaiian Historical Society in Honolulu

For more information on Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America and other books available from Tuttle Publishing, please consult the web site

http://wwwtuttlepublishing.com

DSCF4948

For more information on the North American Japanese Garden Association, please consult the web site:

http://www.najga.com

Categories: Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Missouri, Texas | Tags: , , , , | 5 Comments

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