Posts Tagged With: Queen Lili`uokalani

Celebrate the Queen’s birthday Saturday September 7

The 20th annual He Hali`a Aloha No Lili`uokalani is Saturday, September 7

Newsletter September 2019

Here is the link to Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens newsletter for the month of September 2019.

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Finding the Right Color

A mistake in paint color in February 2014 and a passing remark by a visiting Japanese garden designer from Kyoto lead to a five year effort by Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens to find the right paint color for the wooden bridge.

Historic photos inform present-day decisions: some carpentry details in the railings were missing in recent years. 2019 repairs restored some details

The wooden bridge is an  iconic feature in the century-old tropical Japanese public garden in Hilo Hawaii. It may have been the garden’s first successful fundraising effort.

Charles C. and Laura Kennedy in their yard, Pueo, Hilo, HI circa 1908
(McKay family album, Hawaii State Archives)

Garden booster Laura Kennedy went to her husband C.C. Kennedy in 1917 when he was retired as manager of Waiakea Sugar Mill, and received $1,000.

One source credits a Hilo contractor and landscape designer Mr. Yamamoto with the design and construction of the wooden bridge using that first $1,000. Other stories have the bridge built in Kyoto and shipped over to Hilo to be assembled by Mr. Yamamoto, who came to Hawai`i from Kyoto at the behest of the Kennedys following their tour of Japan in 1914. Yamamoto did the landscaping at Bide-A-Wee, the Kennedy “mountain home” in Volcano village.

unidentified gardener during construction of Lili`uokalani Gardens, possibly Mr. Yamamoto, square roof pavilion at left is to one side of the wooden bridge
(courtesy Lyman Museum archives)

In any event, a wooden bridge has been at that location since Lili`uokalani Gardens was first built.

The railing details still existed during WWII (photo taken 17 December 1944, collection of Hawaii Historic Society)

The tsunami of 1946 brought destruction to the gardens. Restoration went on for several years, mainly in and after 1949 when some funding was obtained from the Territorial Legislature.

Obana family collection courtesy Hawai`i Japanese Center in Hilo

late 1940s postcard, collection of the author

George Mattos in the mid-1970s (courtesy of Eric Mattos)

Up to this point, the bridge had been through several colors including tan, green, brown, and red. When the bridge was painted red, it was a tone of red more toward the orange end of the scale. The stairs were not painted, but the landing was a dark green with a dark red mon inscribed in the center.

Then in 2014, this happened.

February 2014 a very glossy, very bright red was applied to the bridge and pale green to the stairs — note the missing boards in the railing

That fall, a fifth generation Japanese garden designer visited from Kyoto. During a walk through Lili`uokalani Gardens, Takuhiro Yamada of Hanatoyo Landscape crossed this bridge, looked from side to side, shook his head and muttered “Chinese colors.” The hunt was on to find a tone of paint that would be “Shuiro” more suitable for this structure.

Board member Kenji Kuroshima solicited a color sample from one of his guests. They brought calligraphy ink. It couldn’t be matched by any local paint store. A Honolulu Buddhist minister while traveling in Kyoto asked friends to provide a paint sample or formula and Takuhiro Yamada of Hanatoyo Landscape sent a paint formula. No one here could make heads or tails out of the Munsell color system or the formula. Photographs were provided. No paint store can make paint from a photograph. A paint chip was needed.

Shurio paint color formula, courtesy Takuhiro Yamada

Last year Yamada-san provided a paint sample book. Sherwin-Williams in Hilo had a new scanner, which we were tipped to by County painter Alton Nosaka. Everything fell together and the five year search for shuiro was at an end.

A small arrow points to Shuiro, the color of Kenji’s dreams and Takuhiro’s experience

Carpentry repairs were made to include the missing pieces in the railings and primer was applied thanks to Riki Nakano-Domen and Moses Alani Hauanio.

Top image circa 1920, bottom image 16 August 2019 with carpentry complete and primer applied

The barge arrived Friday late afternoon with the paint, which will be mixed and applied Monday — all in time for the 20th annual He Hali`a Aloha No Lili`uokalani, the Queen’s Birthday Festival.

Please come to Lili`uokalani Gardens Saturday, September 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. to celebrate the Queen’s birthday. Live entertainment, mass hula, orchid drop, children’s games and activities, cultural demonstrators, tea ceremony, taiko and more are planned for this free family fun day.

Overflow parking is at Afook-Chinen Civic Center with a shuttle bus running all day.

 

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Annual Queen’s Birthday Festival coming to the gardens

Many thanks to Aaron Miyasato of 4digitalinc for design and production of this year’s poster

He Hali`a Aloha No Lili`uokalani is the major event for September.

More happenings in the future plus photographs of events in August are included in the September newsletter. To see all four pages of the newsletter, just click on the PDF link.

Newsletter September 2018

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Memorial Service marks the beginning of a centennial year

When she was Princess, Lili`uokalani accompanied Queen Kapi`olani to London for Queen Victoria's Jubilee. The black ribbon gown shown here recently was reproduced as part of the Ali`i Gown Project of Friends of `Iolani Palace. The gown was on display in Sangha Hall following the memorial service.

When she was Princess, Lili`uokalani accompanied Queen Kapi`olani to London for Queen Victoria’s Jubilee. The black ribbon gown shown here recently was reproduced as part of the Ali`i Gown Project of Friends of `Iolani Palace. The gown was on display in Sangha Hall following the memorial service. Photo: WikiCommons

 

Lili`uokalani, Queen of Hawai`i, passed away on 11 November 1917.

Because she was compassionate toward Japanese immigrant subjects of the Kingdom, because she attended a Hongwanji service in May of 1901, because she maintained a connection to Hilo throughout her life, and because Buddhist practice marks the 100th year a year earlier than Western practice, a 100th Memorial Service was held Sunday, October 30, at Honpa Hongwanji Hilo Betsuin on Kilauea Avenue.

The first Hongwanji built in the island kingdom was this structure in Hilo, located on the ocean side of the intersection of Ponahawaii and Front Streets in 1889.

The first Hongwanji built in the island kingdom was this structure in Hilo, located on the ocean side of the intersection of Ponahawaii and Front Streets in 1889. Photo: Buddhism in Hawai`i

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The first Hongwanji Mission in Honolulu was located on Fort Lane. Lili`uokalani attended a Gotan-e service here in May 1901 at the invitation of her friend Mary Foster. Photo: Honpa Hongwanji Hawaii Betsuin web site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ten months in planning, the memorial service Sunday was given by Rimban Jeffrey Soga. Emcee and planning committee chairperson was Barbara Fujimoto, who is active in the Buddhist Women’s Association. Ho`okani ka pu, the opening conch shell and chant by Kumu Kaho`okele Crabbe blended with kansho, the Buddhist temple bell ringing as 293 participants inside the temple rose in honor of the entrance of family descendants Keawe and Kaimi Keohokalole with the Royal Order of Kamehameha the First, Mamalahoa Chapter, `Ahahui Kaahumanu Helu `Ekolu, and Hale `O Na Ali`i `O Hawai`i.

Kumu Moses Kaho`okele sounds the conch shell followed by a chant to lead in a procession of family and royal societies

Kumu Moses Kaho`okele sounds the conch shell followed by a chant to lead in a procession of family and royal societies      Photo: K.T. Cannon-Eger

 

Special guests for the gathering included former First Lady of Hawai`i, Jean Ariyoshi, who spearheaded a movement to restore Washington Place, the Queen’s home that served as the Governor’s residence to several Hawaii leaders. The book Washington Place: A First Lady’s Story, published in 2004 by Belknap Publishing and Deign for the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, documents the story.

Mrs. Ariyoshi and her husband former Governor George Ariyoshi also are deeply involved with Urasenke and helped bring the practice of tea to Hawaii in the 1970s. Tea houses are located on the campus of the University of Hawaii-Manoa behind the East-West Center, in Kepaniwai Park on Maui, and in Lili`uokalani Gardens in Hilo.

Accompanying Mrs. Ariyoshi were Russ Oda, president, and Art Taniguchi, vice president, of Urasenke Society of Hilo.

100memorialsoga_3035

Rimban Soga conducted the service at Honpa Hongwanji Hilo Betsuin.     Photo: K.T. Cannon-Eger

100memorialmatsumoto_3036

Bishop Eric Matsumoto came from Honolulu to deliver a message of peace.  Photo: K.T. Cannon-Eger

Bishop Eric Matsumoto offered a dharma message on the Queen’s life and dedication to peace, compassion and wisdom.

A “surprise” visit to the memorial service by the Queen, in the person of Jackie Pualani Johnson of UH-Hilo theatre department, brought the Queen’s recollections of the early 1900s to life.

The memorial service was followed by refreshments in Sangha Hall, based on the menu of the 1901 service the Queen attended. Displays were offered there from Lili`uokalani Trust, Friends of `Iolani Palace, Nelson Makua and Na Makua Designs, and Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens.

pualaniat100th_8363

Recalling the story of “Paoakalani,” the Queen was presented with a bouquet wrapped in newspaper.  Photo: K.T. Cannon-Eger

black ribbon gown reproduction on display in Sangha Hall

black ribbon gown reproduction on display in Sangha Hall

black ribbon gown on display in Sangha Hall

black ribbon gown on display in Sangha Hall

presentation of the Ali`i Gown Project by Friends of `Iolani Palace

presentation of the Ali`i Gown Project by Friends of `Iolani Palace

The Buddhist memorial service marks the beginning of a year of centennial events for Hilo’s treasured cultural landscape, Lili`uokalani Gardens, a 24-acre public garden on Banyan Drive.

For further information and to help, contact Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens by email to kteger@hawaii.rr.com or phone (808) 895-8130.

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