Second pond cleaning day set for Saturday, November 19

UH-Hilo students join in the fun at Waihonu to remove decades of accumulated muck and search for buried treasure.

UH-Hilo students join in the fun at Waihonu to remove decades of accumulated muck and search for buried treasure.

More hands are needed for continued pond cleaning.

More hands are needed for continued pond cleaning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens and community volunteers will continue cleaning Waihonu, the pond at the heart of Lili`uokalani Gardens on Banyan Drive in Hilo, on Saturday, November 19 from 8 a.m. until noon.

People going in the pond will be provided with gloves and protective foot wear. Refreshments and lunch will be served to all volunteers.

For further information and to volunteer, contact Alton Okinaka at alton@hawaii.edu or telephone (808) 383-4917.

[photos courtesy of Gordon Heit]

To learn more about Hilo’s cultural landscape, listen to Island Issues with host Sherry Bracken who sent the following note.

Lili’uokalani Gardens in Hilo on the Waiakea Peninsula, towards downtown Hilo from the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel, is a beautiful, tranquil Japanese-style garden created on land mostly donated to Hilo by Queen Lili’uokalani at the beginning of the last century. Learn about this treasure in a discussion with Island Issues host Sherry Bracken and two members of Friends of Lili’uokalani Gardens, K. T. Cannon-Eger and Jane Hite…Sunday, November 13, 6:30 a.m. KKOA 107.7 fm, 8 a.m. LAVA 105.3 fm, or listen to the podcast any time at www.lava1053.com/podcast/island-issues

 

 

 

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , | Leave a comment

North American Japanese Garden Association plans regional conferences in 2017

Descanso Gardens in Flintridge near Los Angeles will host the North American Japanese Garden Association regional conference in January 2017 Photo courtesy of Descanso Gardens

Descanso Gardens in Flintridge near Los Angeles will host the North American Japanese Garden Association regional conference in January 2017 Photo courtesy of Descanso Gardens

Saturday and Sunday, January 14 and 15, 2017 a regional conference will be held in Southern California at Descanso Gardens in Flintridge.

Marking the 50th anniversary of Descanso Gardens, the conference is designed to “explore the Japanese garden experience in Southern California in a two-day regional event featuring hands-on workshops, an exhibition, lectures on horticulture and history and expert-led tours of five Asian gardens,” said a release from the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA).

“Descanso Gardens, just northeast of downtown Los Angeles, is celebrating the 50th year of its Japanese garden. Descanso is embracing the garden’s evolving form, its identity as a focal point for a multi-cultural community and its role in inspiring new artistic creation. For lovers of camellia, a familiar plant in the Japanese garden, Descanso is home to the largest camellia collection in North America.

“The Japanese garden at the nearby Huntington boasts a history over 100 years as well as a legacy of evolution and renovation seen in its restored Japanese House and a new tea garden. Two other large gardens in the area — the SuiHoen (Garden of Water and Fragrance) in Van Nuys and the Storrier-Stearns Japanese Garden in Pasadena — illustrate how Japanese gardens can demonstrate the sustainable use of water in even an arid climate. All of these gardens feature exceptional garden architecture that makes use of Southern California’s year-round warmth and indoor-outdoor lifestyle.”

For further information and to register, contact NAJGA at http://www.najga.org/Southern-California-2017

NAJGA logo

Categories: California, Los Angeles | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Memorial Service marks the beginning of a centennial year

When she was Princess, Lili`uokalani accompanied Queen Kapi`olani to London for Queen Victoria's Jubilee. The black ribbon gown shown here recently was reproduced as part of the Ali`i Gown Project of Friends of `Iolani Palace. The gown was on display in Sangha Hall following the memorial service.

When she was Princess, Lili`uokalani accompanied Queen Kapi`olani to London for Queen Victoria’s Jubilee. The black ribbon gown shown here recently was reproduced as part of the Ali`i Gown Project of Friends of `Iolani Palace. The gown was on display in Sangha Hall following the memorial service. Photo: WikiCommons

 

Lili`uokalani, Queen of Hawai`i, passed away on 11 November 1917.

Because she was compassionate toward Japanese immigrant subjects of the Kingdom, because she attended a Hongwanji service in May of 1901, because she maintained a connection to Hilo throughout her life, and because Buddhist practice marks the 100th year a year earlier than Western practice, a 100th Memorial Service was held Sunday, October 30, at Honpa Hongwanji Hilo Betsuin on Kilauea Avenue.

The first Hongwanji built in the island kingdom was this structure in Hilo, located on the ocean side of the intersection of Ponahawaii and Front Streets in 1889.

The first Hongwanji built in the island kingdom was this structure in Hilo, located on the ocean side of the intersection of Ponahawaii and Front Streets in 1889. Photo: Buddhism in Hawai`i

hongwanjifortlane

The first Hongwanji Mission in Honolulu was located on Fort Lane. Lili`uokalani attended a Gotan-e service here in May 1901 at the invitation of her friend Mary Foster. Photo: Honpa Hongwanji Hawaii Betsuin web site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ten months in planning, the memorial service Sunday was given by Rimban Jeffrey Soga. Emcee and planning committee chairperson was Barbara Fujimoto, who is active in the Buddhist Women’s Association. Ho`okani ka pu, the opening conch shell and chant by Kumu Kaho`okele Crabbe blended with kansho, the Buddhist temple bell ringing as 293 participants inside the temple rose in honor of the entrance of family descendants Keawe and Kaimi Keohokalole with the Royal Order of Kamehameha the First, Mamalahoa Chapter, `Ahahui Kaahumanu Helu `Ekolu, and Hale `O Na Ali`i `O Hawai`i.

Kumu Moses Kaho`okele sounds the conch shell followed by a chant to lead in a procession of family and royal societies

Kumu Moses Kaho`okele sounds the conch shell followed by a chant to lead in a procession of family and royal societies      Photo: K.T. Cannon-Eger

 

Special guests for the gathering included former First Lady of Hawai`i, Jean Ariyoshi, who spearheaded a movement to restore Washington Place, the Queen’s home that served as the Governor’s residence to several Hawaii leaders. The book Washington Place: A First Lady’s Story, published in 2004 by Belknap Publishing and Deign for the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, documents the story.

Mrs. Ariyoshi and her husband former Governor George Ariyoshi also are deeply involved with Urasenke and helped bring the practice of tea to Hawaii in the 1970s. Tea houses are located on the campus of the University of Hawaii-Manoa behind the East-West Center, in Kepaniwai Park on Maui, and in Lili`uokalani Gardens in Hilo.

Accompanying Mrs. Ariyoshi were Russ Oda, president, and Art Taniguchi, vice president, of Urasenke Society of Hilo.

100memorialsoga_3035

Rimban Soga conducted the service at Honpa Hongwanji Hilo Betsuin.     Photo: K.T. Cannon-Eger

100memorialmatsumoto_3036

Bishop Eric Matsumoto came from Honolulu to deliver a message of peace.  Photo: K.T. Cannon-Eger

Bishop Eric Matsumoto offered a dharma message on the Queen’s life and dedication to peace, compassion and wisdom.

A “surprise” visit to the memorial service by the Queen, in the person of Jackie Pualani Johnson of UH-Hilo theatre department, brought the Queen’s recollections of the early 1900s to life.

The memorial service was followed by refreshments in Sangha Hall, based on the menu of the 1901 service the Queen attended. Displays were offered there from Lili`uokalani Trust, Friends of `Iolani Palace, Nelson Makua and Na Makua Designs, and Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens.

pualaniat100th_8363

Recalling the story of “Paoakalani,” the Queen was presented with a bouquet wrapped in newspaper.  Photo: K.T. Cannon-Eger

black ribbon gown reproduction on display in Sangha Hall

black ribbon gown reproduction on display in Sangha Hall

black ribbon gown on display in Sangha Hall

black ribbon gown on display in Sangha Hall

presentation of the Ali`i Gown Project by Friends of `Iolani Palace

presentation of the Ali`i Gown Project by Friends of `Iolani Palace

The Buddhist memorial service marks the beginning of a year of centennial events for Hilo’s treasured cultural landscape, Lili`uokalani Gardens, a 24-acre public garden on Banyan Drive.

For further information and to help, contact Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens by email to kteger@hawaii.rr.com or phone (808) 895-8130.

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Big pond project starts with bucket brigade

Waihonu, the pond at the heart of Lili`uokalani Gardens, will start getting a much needed cleaning Saturday, October 1, from 8 a.m. to noon.

Tsunami damage, bagasse from former sugar cane operations up the coast, invasive seaweed and normal silt have covered the floor of Waihonu.

Volunteers will gather at the Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens tent near the tea house for instructions and to obtain tools. There also are land-based tasks for those not able to go in one of two shallow spring-fed ponds to the side of the larger pond.

cleanpondbefore_1790

To the Banyan Drive side of the pond are two small spring-fed ponds choked with invasive seaweed, silt and weeds. The nearby lava outcroppings are covered with bamboo leaves.

cleanpondharvey-0738

A previous cleaning effort uncovered a pahoehoe lava landing near the stone bridge

harvey-8125

Harvey Tajiri piles seaweed up.

sidewalkdetailpau_1566

edging the sidewalk

teamdetail2_1548

many thanks to UH-Hilo softball coaches and team

 

 

wally-8124

Rotarian Wally Wong scoops seaweed out of the pond

Volunteers willing to go in the pond should come with protective foot gear. Some additional pairs of tabis and gloves will be available to borrow.

Additional chores on land include edging sidewalks, removing leaves from lava rock outcroppings, removing weeds from the stone bridge, and removing lichen from a rock bench.

For additional information or to volunteer for a future work day, contact Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens board members Alton Okinaka at UH-Hilo 932-7117 or K.T. Cannon-Eger 895-8130.

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Gratitude for the Gardens continues

For one year, Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens has dedicated substantial volunteer resources to the task of thinning an overgrown bamboo thicket. Friday, August 5, 2016, we hope to finish the removing all dead stalks from the last two clumps. This will make continued maintenance of the area much easier.

“This will make the area much better for the annual Queen Lili`uokalani birthday festival,” said Kenji Kuroshima.

Come join Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens from 8 a.m. until noon. Refreshments will be provided and with advance notice lunch will be ordered.

Below are a series of photos showing progress during the past year.

Starting in July 2015, the bamboo contained innumerable dead stalks trapped tightly. Over time, a great deal of material has been removed. Some of it was offered to the public for any craft projects they might have. The Bamboo Society joined in and offered workshops showing how to utilize bamboo in a variety of ways. Two dump truck loads were given to a local nursery to chip into mulch. The rest went to Hilo’s green waste recycling area at the County landfill.

Slowly, workers opened up the thicket, re-establishing paths through the middle. The patch began to sing, according to Kenji Kuroshima of Kobe and Hilo, who directs the efforts. “Healthy bamboo sings. There is sun reaching inside. New views are opened up. And the breeze makes the bamboo sing.”

FOLG-March-0503 (3)

Mayor Billy Kenoi (center shaka with white ball cap) and his department heads and staff joined Sierra Club, Lions, Fukushima Kenjin Kai, and Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens for spring cleaning at the bamboo patch.

Kenji_1017

Kenji Kuroshima says healthy bamboo sings.

MelCasey2016

Mel and Casey Jones assist with bagging bamboo leaves. Now the lantern is visible as is the gravel pathway on the other side.

JackyWinstonWally_1096

Yoshihisa Matsushita and Winston Towata of the Fukushima Kenjin Kai and Wally Wong of the Rotary Club of Hilo worked on the July 1, 2016 cleanup to prepare the area for the Fourth of July weekend and the Tanabata Festival the following weekend.

The County removed a dump truck load of green waste from the bamboo patch following Tropical Storm Darby in July 2016.

At the end of the day, August 5, 2016, more air flowed through the bamboo patch and several views through were re-established. The County brought their chipper and the remaining pile was gone in no time.

All photos are by K.T. Cannon-Eger, except the one of Mayor Kenoi’s group. That photo is by Ilihia Gionson. If you share photos or this article, please be nice and give credit.

Comments are welcome, but please do not waste your time trying to post spam as all comments are reviewed before they appear.

 

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Sasebo in Albuquerque’s BioPark

albu-10-9-12-23

lantern at the entry to Sasebo

AlbuGarden-10-9-12-11

site map — the Japanese garden is at the top, center, of the map

A small train loops through the very large ABQ BioPark. One of its stops is outside the Japanese garden.

Sasebo is a four-acre Japanese garden built to honor one of Albuquerque’s Sister Cities.

Sasebo opened in September 2007. It was designed by Toru Tanaka, founder of the Portland Landscape Design and Japanese Garden Specialty.

AlbuGarden-10-9-12-28

bench carved from a fallen log

AlbuGarden-10-9-12-29

view over a staff access gate to the waterfall

SaseboPond

the waterfall from the far side of the pond

Albugarden-10-9-12-33

an interior path crosses a small stream

IMG_1232

another type of path to cross a stream

Two types of fence, one provides shade for a utility building and the other marks the boundary between the garden interior and the welcoming plaza and bell tower.

Photographs otherwise not credited are by K.T. Cannon-Eger Comments and sharing are welcome. Should you share an article or photo, please be nice and give credit. Please do not waste your time trying to post spam comments. All comments are reviewed before posting.

More information and hours of docent led tours are available on the ABQ BioPark web site.

https://www.cabq.gov/culturalservices/biopark/garden/exhibits/japanese-garden

Categories: Albuquerque, New Mexico | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Pokemon Go comes to the gardens

The online game Pokemon Go has taken a giant leap outdoors. The impact on gardens in the United States was immediate and not always pleasant.

Roji-en fell victim to overly enthusiastic Pokemon Go players in the first days following release of the new game.

Roji-en fell victim to overly enthusiastic Pokemon Go players in the first days following release of the new game.

Roji-en at the Morikami Museum and Gardens in Delray Beach, Florida, immediately took to social media posting photographs of damage to trees and benches. Pleas were made for common sense as The Morikami set out a few ground rules.

“Attention all Pokemon Trainers: As your teams vie for supremacy over each other, we ask you to keep a few ground rules in mind:
Please be respectful of our property and natural resources. Stay on the designated paths at all times—absolutely no climbing on the trees!
“No vandalism of any kind will be tolerated in the garden.
Please respect your fellow visitors, which includes refraining from disruptive behavior, such as running or yelling.
The garden is for everyone; let’s make sure we can all enjoy it!”

Within a few hours of their post, The Morikami had more than 300 comments on Facebook. The perpetrators were located and apologies made.

The Atlanta Botanical Gardens invited Pokemon fans to post their screenshots. “We hear the Garden is a GREAT place to catch ’em all, and we’re super excited to have several Pokéstops as well.” Visitors are encouraged to share screenshots ‪#‎pokemonGO‬

The Birmingham (Alabama) Botanical Gardenis having a “Catch ‘Em All” event in the gardens tomorrow (July 15).

BirminghamPokemon

At the Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the game has obsessed players trespassing at night to gain more points. John VanderHaagen, public relations manager, said Meijer Gardens staff are thrilled that droves of Pokemon Go players are visiting the gardens, as long as it’s during regular hours.

“We do encourage players to be aware of their surroundings and follow our basic rules of not touching the sculpture and staying on pathways and mowed lawn areas only,” he said in an email.

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2016/07/pokemon_go_brings_late-night_t.html

In Hilo, the Hawaii Tribune-Herald ran a font page story today (July 14) that continued to the back page of the front section with many photos by Hollyn Johnson. Just yesterday George DeMello at Sig Zane Designs mentioned the invasion of Lili`uokalani Gardens.

“There’s no place to park and take a walk,” said DeMello. “And the gardens look so lovely.”

http://www.hawaiitribune-herald.com/news/local-news/catch-em-if-you-can-pokemon-go-smartphone-game-huge-hit-hilo

Nearby, Banyan Gallery owner Jelena Clay noted an influx of shoppers who were also seeking to capture points in the game.

Have fun, be safe, and respect the gardens.

UPDATE FRIDAY, JULY 15:

A news story from Hawaii News Now published yesterday states that Niantic Inc., the developer of Pokemon Go, says it has corrected a mistake in the app. Users who checked in with iPhones through a Google account found that they were allowing full access to their account information. Niantic says the problem is fixed, but advises users to log out and download the update.

HISTORY:

Geocaching games predate Pokemon Go

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-07-12/long-before-pokemon-go-there-was-geocaching

UPDATE THURSDAY, JULY 21:

Some gardens are making great use of the increased visitor count. Nikka Yuko in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, has opened in the evening with two different ticket rates: one for those visiting the gardens and another for those wishing to see a movie also.

an example of a character found at Nikka Yuko

an example of a character found at Nikka Yuko

view of increased visitor count due to Pokemon Go craze

view of increased visitor count due to Pokemon Go craze

UPDATE FRIDAY, JULY 22

On the same day Pokemon Go was released in Japan, Izumo Taisha — one of the oldest and most highly regarded Shinto shrines — announced a ban on drones and on playing Pokemon Go on its grounds and surroundings.

http://kotaku.com/pokemon-go-banned-at-a-religious-shrine-in-japan-1784102983

UPDATE: FRIDAY, JULY 28

Hiroshima’s Peace Park reports 30 Pokestops and 3 gyms were in and around an area considered sacred. The city of Hiroshima has asked Pokemon Go’s creators to remove the monsters before the August 6, the annual ceremony of the bombing.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-36891787

UPDATE: MONDAY, AUGUST 22

Pokemon Go continues to be the most popular outdoor video game. Recent postings on Instagram give maps to characters in The Morikami in Florida and in Lili`uokalani Gardens in Hilo.

a recent map of Pokemon Go characters at Roji-en, Morikami, Delray Beach, Florida

a recent map of Pokemon Go characters at Roji-en, Morikami, Delray Beach, Florida

a recent map of Pokemon Go characters at Lili`uokalani Gardens in Hilo, Hawaii

a recent map of Pokemon Go characters at Lili`uokalani Gardens in Hilo, Hawaii

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Categories: Alabama, Alberta, Atlanta, Birmingham, Canada, Delray Beach, Florida, Georgia, Grand Rapids, Hawaii, Hilo, Japan, Michigan | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Balboa Park planned for years to celebrate centennial

impressive entry sign on the corner across from the Spreckles Organ

impressive entry sign on the corner across from the Spreckles Organ; the cafe straight ahead provides monthly income; the entry gate is to the right of the cafe     [Bill F. Eger photo]

Takeo Uesugi and Associates plan for the garden

Takeo Uesugi and Associates plan for the garden was posted near an overlook     [Bill F. Eger photo]

red ribbon marks size of original Japanese garden; model shows expansion completed in time for centennial

red ribbon marks size of original Japanese garden; model shows size of expansion completed in time for centennial

San Diego’s civic leaders set aside 1,400 acres in 1868 for a park. It sat unused for more than 20 years until Kate Sessions stepped forward with an offer to plant 100 trees a year in the park as well as donations to other sites in San Diego. An exchange was worked out for 32 acres within the park for her commercial nursery.

After the turn of the century, a master plan was introduced, taxes levied, and a water system installed. In 1910, planning was underway for the first World’s Fair to be held on its grounds and, after months of discussion, Park Commissioners decided on renaming City Park as Balboa Park.

The Panama-California Exposition of 1915-1916 marked the first Japanese tea house within park boundaries at a different location than the present cafe.

San Diego, C.P. Expo 1914, image #5431, used with permission of SDJFG

San Diego, Panama-California Expo, image #5431, used with permission of SDJFG

The Japanese Friendship Garden of San Diego began in 1990 with a dry garden and pavilion by Ken Nakajima on about an acre and a half site between the Spreckles Organ and the Hospitality House. In 1999 a cafe and patio were added to generate revenue for the garden and a koi pond was installed.

new gate marks entry to the expanded garden

new gate marks entry to the expanded garden     [Bill F. Eger photo]

the new gate from the other side

the new gate from the other side     [Bill F. Eger photo 2012]

In 2010, ground was broken for garden expansion to nearly 11 acres including an adjacent canyon. Designed by Takeo Uesugi and Associates, the expanded garden includes huge rock waterfalls, meandering paths, traditional bridges, a culture center and cherry tree grove. Tea houses remain to be constructed.

To plan a trip to the Japanese Friendship Garden of San Diego or see the events calendar, please review the web site: http://www.niwa.org/

For additional information on all of Balboa Park, please contact the web site: http://www.balboapark.org/

or for the app, text Balboa Park to 56512.

We welcome thoughtful remarks and questions. Do not waste your time trying to post spam as all comments are reviewed before publishing.

Any otherwise uncredited photos are by K.T. Cannon-Eger. Please feel free to share this blog and please be nice and give credit when you do.

 

Categories: California, San Diego | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

National Public Gardens Day celebrated with Gratitude to the Gardens

image

Mayoral Proclamation recognizes three Hawai’i Island public gardens: Pana`ewa Rainforest Zoo & Gardens, Hawai`i Tropical Botanical Gardens and Lili`uokalani Gardens

Char presents the 2016 public gardens proclamation to K.T.

Char presents the 2016 public gardens proclamation to K.T.

 

a copy of the proclamation was delivered to Pana`ewa Rainforest Zoo & Gardens

a copy of the proclamation was delivered to Pana`ewa Rainforest Zoo & Gardens

Friends of Lili’uokalani Gardens will sponsor the third annual “Gratitude for the Gardens” Saturday, May 7, from 8 a.m. until noon at the County Park on Banyan Drive.

Participants are asked to wear closed toe shoes and eye protection, and bring their garden gloves and favorite rake.

“First called the ‘crown jewel at the entry to the Crescent City’ during construction in 1917, Lili`uokalani Gardens is also remembered by old timers as ‘Nihon Koen’ or Japan Public Park,” said K.T. Cannon-Eger, president of the Friends group.

Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens is helping the County to prepare for centennial celebrations in 2017. Volunteers have helped clear invasive seaweed from Waihonu, the pond at the heart of the garden. Other gifts of gratitude include trimming small trees, replacing dead bushes, fertilizing azalea and camellias, treating sago palms for cycad scale, and thinning the overgrown bamboo thicket, among others.

Mel at the end of this job weeding and replanting dwarf mondo grass (K.T. Cannon-Eger)

Mel Jones at the end of this job: weeding and replanting dwarf mondo grass at the first “Gratitude for the Garden” event in 2014
(photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger)

Mel and Flor weed the dwarf mondo grass

Mel and Flor weed the dwarf mondo grass in 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yoshiko uses a bamboo broom from Kyoto on the garden around Shoroan

Yoshiko uses a bamboo broom from Kyoto on the garden around Shoroan

“We are most grateful for Mayor Billy Kenoi and his continued support for parks throughout our County,” said Cannon-Eger.

mucking out spring-fed pond to remove invasive seaweed

mucking out spring-fed pond to remove invasive seaweed

Wally Wong worked with Harvey Tajiri to clear this small section of the pond of invasive seaweed

Wally Wong worked with Harvey Tajiri to clear this small section of the pond of invasive seaweed

For further information on Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens and centennial plans, contact Cannon-Eger at kteger@hawaii.rr.com or phone (808) 895-8130.

 

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Short walk in Los Angeles yields several gardens

DSCF1782

Los Angeles, San Jose, and San Francisco plus a few places remaining in Berkeley and San Diego offer visitors to those California cities glimpses into the old days of Japantowns. Here a daruma is one image of three on fans attached to utility poles throughout Little Tokyo in Los Angeles.          [photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger]

We passed through Los Angeles on our way to a Japanese garden conference in Denver sponsored by the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA). During a previous conference some years earlier, a tour guided us through the triangular garden at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center designed by Takeo Uesugi in the early 1970s. Thirty years later, Mr. Uesugi returned for a complete renewal of the same garden, which also involved modifying the downstairs conference room with folding glass doors that would open completely, blending inside and outside.

As is true with many gardens, it is named not for the location, organization, or designer. This is the James Irvine Japanese Garden named for the foundation whose generosity made this hidden gem possible. It also is known as Senryu-en, Garden of the Clear Stream.

JACCC1432

David Sipos hand planed and traditionally built bridge is holding up very nicely

For more information on the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center, please look at their web site: http://www.jaccc.org/#japanese-american-cultural-community-center

Across the brick plaza and past the Isamu Noguchi sculpture to the other side is a wonderful wander through the stores and restaurants of Little Tokyo.

JACCC1447plaza-2

On the other side of that is East First Street and the “new” Nishi Hongwanji of Los Angeles.

Members of the sangha took time to point out how grateful they felt to have quite a number of landscapers among their membership. My personal favorites were the rustic lantern on the First Street side and several beautifully pruned pines.

For more information on the Nishi Hongwanji Los Angeles Betsuin contact their web site: http://www.nishihongwanji-la.org/

Back up First Street is the old Nishi Hongwanji building, now part of the Japanese American National Museum campus.

Exterior glass admits great light far into the interior. The glass is continued inside with a very subtle gratitude to donors “wall” between the great hall and the outdoor cafe.

For more information on the Japanese American National Museum, contact their web site: http://www.janm.org/

Between the old Nishi Hongwanji and the Japanese American National Museum, a wide plaza leads back to monuments dedicated to Japanese American service in World War II. “Go For Broke” was their motto.

Further up the street is Anzen Hardware, covered in an earlier post.

Where do I find…..

And then back to the hotel we chose for proximity to all these places and the exquisite third floor garden, accessible via elevator from the lobby.

Kyoto Gardens has become a Hilton DoubleTree. The garden hosts many wedding parties.

Before leaving town the following morning, we walked down the street to see the Higashi Hongwanji gardens, presently being maintained by the son of one of the garden’s builders.

Higashi1536

Please do not waste your time trying to post unrelated material (spam). All comments are reviewed before they appear.

Photos by K.T. Cannon-Eger. We welcome helpful remarks and sharing of material. If you share, please be nice and give credit.

 

Categories: California, Los Angeles | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.