Sasebo in Albuquerque’s BioPark

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lantern at the entry to Sasebo

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site map — the Japanese garden is at the top, center, of the map

A small train loops through the very large ABQ BioPark. One of its stops is outside the Japanese garden.

Sasebo is a four-acre Japanese garden built to honor one of Albuquerque’s Sister Cities.

Sasebo opened in September 2007. It was designed by Toru Tanaka, founder of the Portland Landscape Design and Japanese Garden Specialty.

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bench carved from a fallen log

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view over a staff access gate to the waterfall

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the waterfall from the far side of the pond

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an interior path crosses a small stream

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another type of path to cross a stream

Two types of fence, one provides shade for a utility building and the other marks the boundary between the garden interior and the welcoming plaza and bell tower.

Photographs otherwise not credited are by K.T. Cannon-Eger Comments and sharing are welcome. Should you share an article or photo, please be nice and give credit. Please do not waste your time trying to post spam comments. All comments are reviewed before posting.

More information and hours of docent led tours are available on the ABQ BioPark web site.

https://www.cabq.gov/culturalservices/biopark/garden/exhibits/japanese-garden

Categories: Albuquerque, New Mexico | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Pokemon Go comes to the gardens

The online game Pokemon Go has taken a giant leap outdoors. The impact on gardens in the United States was immediate and not always pleasant.

Roji-en fell victim to overly enthusiastic Pokemon Go players in the first days following release of the new game.

Roji-en fell victim to overly enthusiastic Pokemon Go players in the first days following release of the new game.

Roji-en at the Morikami Museum and Gardens in Delray Beach, Florida, immediately took to social media posting photographs of damage to trees and benches. Pleas were made for common sense as The Morikami set out a few ground rules.

“Attention all Pokemon Trainers: As your teams vie for supremacy over each other, we ask you to keep a few ground rules in mind:
Please be respectful of our property and natural resources. Stay on the designated paths at all times—absolutely no climbing on the trees!
“No vandalism of any kind will be tolerated in the garden.
Please respect your fellow visitors, which includes refraining from disruptive behavior, such as running or yelling.
The garden is for everyone; let’s make sure we can all enjoy it!”

Within a few hours of their post, The Morikami had more than 300 comments on Facebook. The perpetrators were located and apologies made.

The Atlanta Botanical Gardens invited Pokemon fans to post their screenshots. “We hear the Garden is a GREAT place to catch ’em all, and we’re super excited to have several Pokéstops as well.” Visitors are encouraged to share screenshots ‪#‎pokemonGO‬

The Birmingham (Alabama) Botanical Gardenis having a “Catch ‘Em All” event in the gardens tomorrow (July 15).

BirminghamPokemon

At the Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the game has obsessed players trespassing at night to gain more points. John VanderHaagen, public relations manager, said Meijer Gardens staff are thrilled that droves of Pokemon Go players are visiting the gardens, as long as it’s during regular hours.

“We do encourage players to be aware of their surroundings and follow our basic rules of not touching the sculpture and staying on pathways and mowed lawn areas only,” he said in an email.

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2016/07/pokemon_go_brings_late-night_t.html

In Hilo, the Hawaii Tribune-Herald ran a font page story today (July 14) that continued to the back page of the front section with many photos by Hollyn Johnson. Just yesterday George DeMello at Sig Zane Designs mentioned the invasion of Lili`uokalani Gardens.

“There’s no place to park and take a walk,” said DeMello. “And the gardens look so lovely.”

http://www.hawaiitribune-herald.com/news/local-news/catch-em-if-you-can-pokemon-go-smartphone-game-huge-hit-hilo

Nearby, Banyan Gallery owner Jelena Clay noted an influx of shoppers who were also seeking to capture points in the game.

Have fun, be safe, and respect the gardens.

UPDATE FRIDAY, JULY 15:

A news story from Hawaii News Now published yesterday states that Niantic Inc., the developer of Pokemon Go, says it has corrected a mistake in the app. Users who checked in with iPhones through a Google account found that they were allowing full access to their account information. Niantic says the problem is fixed, but advises users to log out and download the update.

HISTORY:

Geocaching games predate Pokemon Go

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-07-12/long-before-pokemon-go-there-was-geocaching

UPDATE THURSDAY, JULY 21:

Some gardens are making great use of the increased visitor count. Nikka Yuko in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, has opened in the evening with two different ticket rates: one for those visiting the gardens and another for those wishing to see a movie also.

an example of a character found at Nikka Yuko

an example of a character found at Nikka Yuko

view of increased visitor count due to Pokemon Go craze

view of increased visitor count due to Pokemon Go craze

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Categories: Alabama, Atlanta, Birmingham, Delray Beach, Florida, Georgia, Grand Rapids, Hawaii, Hilo, Michigan | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Balboa Park planned for years to celebrate centennial

impressive entry sign on the corner across from the Spreckles Organ

impressive entry sign on the corner across from the Spreckles Organ; the cafe straight ahead provides monthly income; the entry gate is to the right of the cafe     [Bill F. Eger photo]

Takeo Uesugi and Associates plan for the garden

Takeo Uesugi and Associates plan for the garden was posted near an overlook     [Bill F. Eger photo]

red ribbon marks size of original Japanese garden; model shows expansion completed in time for centennial

red ribbon marks size of original Japanese garden; model shows size of expansion completed in time for centennial

San Diego’s civic leaders set aside 1,400 acres in 1868 for a park. It sat unused for more than 20 years until Kate Sessions stepped forward with an offer to plant 100 trees a year in the park as well as donations to other sites in San Diego. An exchange was worked out for 32 acres within the park for her commercial nursery.

After the turn of the century, a master plan was introduced, taxes levied, and a water system installed. In 1910, planning was underway for the first World’s Fair to be held on its grounds and, after months of discussion, Park Commissioners decided on renaming City Park as Balboa Park.

The Panama-California Exposition of 1915-1916 marked the first Japanese tea house within park boundaries at a different location than the present cafe.

San Diego, C.P. Expo 1914, image #5431, used with permission of SDJFG

San Diego, Panama-California Expo, image #5431, used with permission of SDJFG

The Japanese Friendship Garden of San Diego began in 1990 with a dry garden and pavilion by Ken Nakajima on about an acre and a half site between the Spreckles Organ and the Hospitality House. In 1999 a cafe and patio were added to generate revenue for the garden and a koi pond was installed.

new gate marks entry to the expanded garden

new gate marks entry to the expanded garden     [Bill F. Eger photo]

the new gate from the other side

the new gate from the other side     [Bill F. Eger photo 2012]

In 2010, ground was broken for garden expansion to nearly 11 acres including an adjacent canyon. Designed by Takeo Uesugi and Associates, the expanded garden includes huge rock waterfalls, meandering paths, traditional bridges, a culture center and cherry tree grove. Tea houses remain to be constructed.

To plan a trip to the Japanese Friendship Garden of San Diego or see the events calendar, please review the web site: http://www.niwa.org/

For additional information on all of Balboa Park, please contact the web site: http://www.balboapark.org/

or for the app, text Balboa Park to 56512.

We welcome thoughtful remarks and questions. Do not waste your time trying to post spam as all comments are reviewed before publishing.

Any otherwise uncredited photos are by K.T. Cannon-Eger. Please feel free to share this blog and please be nice and give credit when you do.

 

Categories: California, San Diego | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

National Public Gardens Day celebrated with Gratitude to the Gardens

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Mayoral Proclamation recognizes three Hawai’i Island public gardens: Pana`ewa Rainforest Zoo & Gardens, Hawai`i Tropical Botanical Gardens and Lili`uokalani Gardens

Char presents the 2016 public gardens proclamation to K.T.

Char presents the 2016 public gardens proclamation to K.T.

 

a copy of the proclamation was delivered to Pana`ewa Rainforest Zoo & Gardens

a copy of the proclamation was delivered to Pana`ewa Rainforest Zoo & Gardens

Friends of Lili’uokalani Gardens will sponsor the third annual “Gratitude for the Gardens” Saturday, May 7, from 8 a.m. until noon at the County Park on Banyan Drive.

Participants are asked to wear closed toe shoes and eye protection, and bring their garden gloves and favorite rake.

“First called the ‘crown jewel at the entry to the Crescent City’ during construction in 1917, Lili`uokalani Gardens is also remembered by old timers as ‘Nihon Koen’ or Japan Public Park,” said K.T. Cannon-Eger, president of the Friends group.

Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens is helping the County to prepare for centennial celebrations in 2017. Volunteers have helped clear invasive seaweed from Waihonu, the pond at the heart of the garden. Other gifts of gratitude include trimming small trees, replacing dead bushes, fertilizing azalea and camellias, treating sago palms for cycad scale, and thinning the overgrown bamboo thicket, among others.

Mel at the end of this job weeding and replanting dwarf mondo grass (K.T. Cannon-Eger)

Mel Jones at the end of this job: weeding and replanting dwarf mondo grass at the first “Gratitude for the Garden” event in 2014
(photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger)

Mel and Flor weed the dwarf mondo grass

Mel and Flor weed the dwarf mondo grass in 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yoshiko uses a bamboo broom from Kyoto on the garden around Shoroan

Yoshiko uses a bamboo broom from Kyoto on the garden around Shoroan

“We are most grateful for Mayor Billy Kenoi and his continued support for parks throughout our County,” said Cannon-Eger.

mucking out spring-fed pond to remove invasive seaweed

mucking out spring-fed pond to remove invasive seaweed

Wally Wong worked with Harvey Tajiri to clear this small section of the pond of invasive seaweed

Wally Wong worked with Harvey Tajiri to clear this small section of the pond of invasive seaweed

For further information on Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens and centennial plans, contact Cannon-Eger at kteger@hawaii.rr.com or phone (808) 895-8130.

 

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Short walk in Los Angeles yields several gardens

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Los Angeles, San Jose, and San Francisco plus a few places remaining in Berkeley and San Diego offer visitors to those California cities glimpses into the old days of Japantowns. Here a daruma is one image of three on fans attached to utility poles throughout Little Tokyo in Los Angeles.          [photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger]

We passed through Los Angeles on our way to a Japanese garden conference in Denver sponsored by the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA). During a previous conference some years earlier, a tour guided us through the triangular garden at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center designed by Takeo Uesugi in the early 1970s. Thirty years later, Mr. Uesugi returned for a complete renewal of the same garden, which also involved modifying the downstairs conference room with folding glass doors that would open completely, blending inside and outside.

As is true with many gardens, it is named not for the location, organization, or designer. This is the James Irvine Japanese Garden named for the foundation whose generosity made this hidden gem possible. It also is known as Senryu-en, Garden of the Clear Stream.

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David Sipos hand planed and traditionally built bridge is holding up very nicely

For more information on the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center, please look at their web site: http://www.jaccc.org/#japanese-american-cultural-community-center

Across the brick plaza and past the Isamu Noguchi sculpture to the other side is a wonderful wander through the stores and restaurants of Little Tokyo.

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On the other side of that is East First Street and the “new” Nishi Hongwanji of Los Angeles.

Members of the sangha took time to point out how grateful they felt to have quite a number of landscapers among their membership. My personal favorites were the rustic lantern on the First Street side and several beautifully pruned pines.

For more information on the Nishi Hongwanji Los Angeles Betsuin contact their web site: http://www.nishihongwanji-la.org/

Back up First Street is the old Nishi Hongwanji building, now part of the Japanese American National Museum campus.

Exterior glass admits great light far into the interior. The glass is continued inside with a very subtle gratitude to donors “wall” between the great hall and the outdoor cafe.

For more information on the Japanese American National Museum, contact their web site: http://www.janm.org/

Between the old Nishi Hongwanji and the Japanese American National Museum, a wide plaza leads back to monuments dedicated to Japanese American service in World War II. “Go For Broke” was their motto.

Further up the street is Anzen Hardware, covered in an earlier post.

Where do I find…..

And then back to the hotel we chose for proximity to all these places and the exquisite third floor garden, accessible via elevator from the lobby.

Kyoto Gardens has become a Hilton DoubleTree. The garden hosts many wedding parties.

Before leaving town the following morning, we walked down the street to see the Higashi Hongwanji gardens, presently being maintained by the son of one of the garden’s builders.

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Please do not waste your time trying to post unrelated material (spam). All comments are reviewed before they appear.

Photos by K.T. Cannon-Eger. We welcome helpful remarks and sharing of material. If you share, please be nice and give credit.

 

Categories: California, Los Angeles | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Long time favorite still pleases

In the early 1970s, my husband and I lived in San Francisco before moving to Hawaii. We used to walk all over the city, sometimes hopping on a bus, streetcar or cable car.

Golden Gate Park was a favorite for exhibits at the DeYoung, competitions at the Hall of Flowers, and peaceful respite with tea at the Japanese garden. Coming back to the city in 2012 was a wonderful time to visit with much missed friends. We enjoyed a progressive dinner in Little Italy with appetizers, main course, and coffee with dessert in three different places.

And we couldn’t wait to see the new (to us) additions to the San Francisco Japanese Tea Garden.

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The South Gare, originally from the Japan exhibit at the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco, was partially rebuilt in the 1980s   [photo by Bill F. Eger]

“Originally created as a ‘Japanese Village’ exhibit for the 1894 California Midwinter International Exposition, the site originally spanned about one acre and showcased a Japanese style garden,” according to the gardens website http://japaneseteagardensf.com/

“When the fair closed, Japanese landscape architect Makoto Hagiwara and [park] superintendent John McLaren reached a gentleman’s agreement, allowing Mr. Hagiwara to create and maintain a permanent Japanese style garden as a gift for posterity.”

The Californi fair came to be because Michael H. deYoung was a Presidential appointee to the 1893 fair in Chicago — the World’s Columbian Exposition — and he saw the benefits to his home state. Soon, plans were underway to hold a six-month exhibition in Golden Gate Park from late January to early July 1894.

The San Francisco Japanese Tea Garden is the only ethnological display still in existence from that fair. And Makoto Hagiwara poured his talents and personal wealth into expanding its gardens to five acres.

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real ducks mingle with metal cranes in a pond     [photo by Bill F. Eger]

Makoto died in 1925 and care of the garden passed to his daughter Takano Hagiwara. With the outbreak of World War II and the relocation and incarceration of most Japanese from the West Coast, the Hagiwara family was removed from their beloved garden, which was renamed “The Oriental Tea Garden.” Japanese structures and a Shinto shrine were demolished. Chinese women replaced Japanese tea servers.

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waterfall, stones and lantern reflect in a pond below the iconic tea house  [photo by Bill F. Eger]

Following the war, in the 1950s, a period of reconciliation ensued. The tea house and gift shop were redesigned by Nagao Sakurai. Japanese elements returned to the garden. The name was restored. And most of the Hagiwara family’s dwarf trees returned.

The street in front of the garden entry was renamed Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive and in 1974 artist Ruth Asawa donated a plaque honoring the Hagiwara family’s dedication.

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seasonal color comes with summer’s iris        [photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger]

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traditional pathways blend with more modern walkways   [photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger]

Congratulations to the management on improving the quality of items offered at the gift shop. And a special tip of the hat to the Japanese and Japanese-Americans serving at the tea house. The tea was very tasty.

For more on the history of the San Francisco Japanese Tea Garden, please refer to the garden’s web site mentioned above, and to the web site of Eric Sumiharu Hagiwara-Nagata http://www.hanascape.com/

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Categories: California, San Francisco | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Big park cleanup set for Saturday

Easter approaches (Sunday, March 27) and that signals a season of renewal to which Merrie Monarch Festival is attached. Before an estimated 12,000 visitors descend on Hilo for the annual hula event, Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens is calling on the gardening community to participate in an all-park cleanup Saturday, March 19, from 8 a.m. to noon.

County of Hawai`i department heads, Lions, Master Gardeners, kenjin kai, Boy Scouts, and other community groups have been invited to participate.

Please gather down the steps and ramp off Banyan Drive at the flat area near the lion dogs that were a gift from Nagasaki.

Participants are reminded to wear closed toe shoes, eye protection and gloves. Some tools and trash bags will be provided, but it would be a good idea to bring your favorite rake.

For further information, please contact Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens at (808) 895-8130.

 

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Blue Zones Project in East Hawaii to hold gardening workshop at Lili`uokalani Gardens

http://bluezonesproject.hs-sites.com/hawaii/ehcommunityupdatenewyear2016

“Blue Zones Project is a collaboration between Hawaii Medical Service Association and Healthways to help improve the well-being of all people in Hawaii as measured by the Gallup-Healthways Well Being Index®. By taking an environmental approach to well-being improvement, we have an opportunity to create real change in our community – the kind of change that sparks people’s deepest desires to live well while giving them the tools to do so.”

The Master Gardeners of East Hawaii will participate with a Blue Zones Project gardening workshop in Lili`uokalani Gardens Thursday, February 25, from 10:00 to 11:00 a.m.

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East Hawaii Master Gardeners Association will present a raised bed gardening demonstration. There will be a plant give-away at this free event. (photo courtesy of EHMGA)

The short workshop plus demonstrations will be held on the Lihiwai Street side of the County park, across from Hilo Bay Cafe.

For further information or to register for the free event, please go to the Blue Zones Project East Hawaii link listed in their recent newsletter.

http://bluezonesproject.hs-sites.com/hawaii/ehcommunityupdatenewyear2016

 

 

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Progress at Shoroan with help from Kyoto

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restoring the tsukubai at Shoroan began with a survey of present conditions

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Takuhiro Yamada and Philippe Nault check everything while board member Kenji Kuroshima looks on

Visiting landscaper Takuhiro Yamada, principal of Hanatoyo Landscape in Kyoto, brought a wealth of knowledge about Urasenke tea ceremony to the task to restoring the tsukubai at Shoroan. A tsukubai is an arrangement of stones, a water basin and a lantern set in a very precise manner.

First, a survey of the grounds surrounding Shoroan — the tea house built in Lili`uokalani Gardens and opened in 1997 — was conducted with all attending a hands-on workshop designed for landscapers, County park maintenance personnel, and Master Gardeners.

Next, the tsukubai area was studied in detail. It was discovered that the basin was set too low. The drain rocks were compacted and did not drain. The bamboo spout was too high. The plumbing was in need of repair. Surrounding bushes were in need of pruning. The lantern’s fire box faces the wrong direction. Most of these challenges were solved with several hours work by Hilo and Waimea landscapers under the direction of Mr. Yamada.

David Tamura and his son Troy and Robert Frost re-set a stone at Takuhiro Yamada's direction

David Tamura and his son Troy and Robert Frost re-set a stone at Takuhiro Yamada’s direction

 

The basin was lifted, shifted, and leveled

The basin was lifted, shifted, and leveled

 

Clara Koga sensei, Takuhiro Yamada, Russ Oda and Amy Nishiura test the finished stone arrangement

Clara Koga, sensei, Takuhiro Yamada, Russ Oda and Amy Nishiura test the finished stone arrangement

Plumbing repairs were completed by the County a few days later. Drainage was improved with the addition of smooth river rocks courtesy of Clayton Amemiya matching a few river rocks that were uncovered during excavation of the basin.

Comments to these articles are welcome, but please do not waste your time trying to post spam. All comments are reviewed before they are published. Be nice.

Photos otherwise uncredited are by K.T. Cannon-Eger. If you choose to share this blog, please give credit.

Mahalo and arigato

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sukiya Living magazine ranks Japan and North America gardens

The Adachi Museum and its surrounding gardens in Shimane prefecture are way up top on my bucket list. I have been hearing and reading about this place for years.

Once again, Adachi tops the garden ranking published by Sukiya Living: The Journal of Japanese Gardening in December of each year. The following link lists 50 gardens in Japan and another link at the bottom of this ranking leads to the 2014 rankings.

The 2015 garden ranking for gardens in Japan:

http://gardenrankings.com/

This link will take you directly to the Adachi Museum site:

https://www.adachi-museum.or.jp/en/

For the 2013 garden ranking for Japanese gardens in the United States and Canada, follow in this link. We have seen seven of the ten. There is a more current listing, but we could not locate a link.

http://zengardendreaming.com/?p=518

Shofuso koi

At Shofuso Japanese House and Garden in Philadelphia, koi are so happy they are snorting for joy — well, snorting for food, anyway!

How the Shiosai Project works, by Suikiya Living Magazine, the Journal of Japanese Gardening, published by Roth Teien:

http://gardenrankings.com/faqs/faqs.html

volunteer help

Careful maintenance on a daily basis is the key to a serene garden and Nitobe Memorial Garden in Vancouver BC practices this art

We welcome comments, but please do not waste your time trying to spam. All comments are reviewed before posting.

Seattle

Seattle Japanese Garden has the benefit of a well organized cadre of volunteers to assist park staff with maintenance, guided tours, programs and exhibits

Photographs otherwise not credited in a caption are by K.T. Cannon-Eger. If you re-post, please be nice and give credit.

For more information on Sukiya Living magazine and to subscribe, look for information at http://www.rothteien.com or write to Sukiya Living Magazine & Tours, P.O. Box 1050, Rockport Maine 04856.

Categories: Alberta, British Columbia, Canada, Japan, Philadelphia, Seattle, Washington state | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

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