Posts Tagged With: NAJGA

Blossom time in paradise again…

Two varieties of ornamental cherry trees are available for planting on the Big Island: Pink Cloud and Okame. Both are low-chill varieties, meaning there is a possibility they will succeed at elevations lower than Volcano or Kamuela.

photo by Kenji Kuroshima used with permission This Pink Cloud ornamental cherry tree, a low-chill variety hybridized at the Huntington in Pasadena more than 40 years ago, bloomed lightly in its second year in Hilo.

photo by Kenji Kuroshima used with permission
This Pink Cloud ornamental cherry tree, a low-chill variety hybridized at the Huntington in Pasadena more than 40 years ago, bloomed lightly in its second year in Hilo.

Okame ornamental cherry trees burst into bloom in Panaewa just outside Hilo at Mountain Meadows Nursery.  photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger

Okame ornamental cherry trees burst into bloom in Panaewa just outside Hilo at Mountain Meadows Nursery.
photo by K.T. Cannon-Eger

The two varieties were chosen for their pale pink blossoming habit in addition to the low-chill variety. These trees have been successful in Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego.

For further information on availability on Hawaii Island, contact K.T. Cannon-Eger or Mountain Meadows Nursery in Panaewa.

If you wish availability in the mainland United States, please contact L. E. Cooke Nursery (wholesale nursery orders only) or your local garden shop.

Local sales of Okame and Pink Cloud benefit the Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization working toward the centennial of Hilo’s Lili`uokalani Gardens in 2017.

Here is a link to an article on cherry tree history in Washington, DC, posted by the North American Japanese Garden Association.

https://northamericanjapanesegardenassociation.wordpress.com/2015/03/12/cherry-diplomacy/

 

Categories: Hawaii, Hilo | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Volunteers invited to help clean Lili`uokalani Gardens

The sixth volunteer garden help day at Lili`uokalani Gardens in Hilo, Hawai`i is scheduled for Friday, December 19, from 8 a.m. until noon.

“Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens, East Hawai`i Master Gardeners Association, Moku Aina, Moku Loa Chapter Sierra Club, UH-Hilo exchange students, Urasenke Hilo, and Fukushima Kenjin-kai are among groups who have participated this year in helping our County at this jewel of a park,” said garden enthusiast K.T. Cannon-Eger.

“Through donations to Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens (a 501-c-3 charitable organization), we are able to provide water, trash bags, and gloves to volunteers. Please bring your favorite tool and join in the fun.”

For further information, contact Cannon-Eger at (808) 895-8130.

… and now for something related … a video and news report from NHK on the conference held by the North American Japanese Garden Association in Chicago in mid-October. Please click on the link.

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/english/news/culturesports/20141029.html

fall

Chicago Botanic Garden features chrysanthemum displays in the fall at the Japanese garden.

Categories: Chicago, Hawaii, Hilo, Illinois | Tags: , | Leave a comment

more news about NAJGA in Chicago in October

http://najga.org/Blog-and-Newsletter/3095819

This link posted above is to a North American Japanese Garden Association newsletter, which has more news about the up and coming international conference in Chicago in mid-October.

The Chicago Botanic Garden is a wonderful host. Specialized workshops and tours will be held pre- and post-convention in the Chicago and Rockford area.

For more information, contact the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA) at info@najga.org, tel (503) 222 1194. On-site and one-day registrations are also available.

north end of Osaka Garden

The Palace of Fine Arts for the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition is now the Museum of Science and Industry. This view is from Garden of the Phoenix, the site of a 2014 pre-convention workshop on moss.
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

bridge with seasonal floral display

Chicago Botanic Garden: the entry bridge between the Visitor Center and the Crescent Garden in fall

a cool woodland

a cool woodland with azalea hillside (photo by Bill F. Eger)

Categories: Chicago, Glencoe, Illinois, Rockford | Tags: , | Leave a comment

NAJGA Conference in Chicago in October

This video previews one of Dr. David Slawson’s talking points for his forthcoming skills development workshop happening as part of the 2014 NAJGA biennial conference at the Chicago Botanic Garden this October 16-18:


Go to the NAJGA web site for more information on the conference, speakers, workshops, hands-on training sessions, and tours.
NAJGA Conference 2014

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NAJGA conference set for Chicago

The second biennial conference of the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA) will be held October 16-18, 2014, at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

The theme of this year’s conference is “New Pathways: The Role of the Japanese Garden for Society and Self.”

Hoichi Kurisu

Hoichi Kurisu will be the keynote speaker at the second biennial conference of the North American Japanese Garden Association. He will also offer workshops during the three-day conference.

Keynote speaker is Hoichi Kurisu who studied landscape design and construction under Kenzo Ogata in Tokyo, Japan. Kurisu was appointed Landscape Director for the Garden Society of Japan (Nihon Teien Kyokai 1968–1972), during which time he supervised construction of the Portland Japanese Garden.

In 1972 he founded Kurisu International, Inc., which has since designed and built a number of gardens including the Anderson Japanese Gardens in Rockford, Illinois, Roji-en Japanese Garden at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach, Florida, the Japanese garden at the Dubuque Arboretum and Botanical Gardens in Iowa, and the a Japanese garden for Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, in Lebanon, Oregon, which was the winner of a 2006 Healthcare Environment Award for Landscape Design.

The Morikami Museum

The Morikami Museum in Delray Beach, Florida, is visible from Yamato across a large pond. Roji-en, a collection of Japanese gardens by Hoichi Kurisu is across the bridge and to the left

Kurisu firmly believes that encounters with nature are essential to mental, physical, and spiritual equilibrium. Each of his designs addresses a unique social purpose and reinforces the quality of humanity. By harmonizing light and shade, water and rock, and space with the senses, the Japanese gardens of Hoichi Kurisu restore peace of mind, physical health, and strong and compassionate communities.

His firm presently is at work constructing a new nine-acre Japanese garden in Grand Rapids, Michigan, at the Frederik Meijer Sculpture Garden. The Richard and Helen DeVos Japanese Garden is scheduled to open in June 2015.

An extensive list of workshops covers the basic tracks of horticulture, business culture and human culture with topics such as: Keeping koi healthy, Updating traditional light in the Japanese garden, the new civic garden movement in Japan, Planning for long-term maintenance and renewal, Art of the thatched roof for Japanese garden structures, Art of bamboo, Significance of sukiya style in the Japanese garden, Frank Lloyd Wright and the influence of Japan, Archaeology of the Japanese gardens at Manzanar, Tea in the garden, The Adachi Museum’s operational philosophy, and Using technology to enhance the visitor experience, among other offerings.

The conference also offers pre- and post- conference extended sessions and tours.

The deadline for early registration is July 1. For more information and to register, please refer to the NAJGA web site events page: http://www.najga.org/EVENTS

NAJGA logo

Categories: Chicago, Glencoe, Illinois | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Pond Construction Workshop in Philadelphia

Shofuso koi

koi so happy they are snorting for joy — well, snorting for food, anyway!

ShofusoPond2

During pond reconstruction last year, stones designed to be a boat landing were discovered. The original plans for the garden — made in the mid-1950s — were carried out in the renovation and now provide a koi feeding station at Shofuso Japanese House and Garden.

[The first part of this post announced the workshop. See the end of the post for more photos of the garden and workshop.]

The North American Japanese Garden Association will present a two-day regional workshop in Philadelphia, PA, Friday and Saturday September 20 and 21.

The first day will begin with a presentation on the history and significance of water in the Japanese garden setting by Seiko Goto, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture at Rutgers University. Professor Goto holds a Master in Horticulture from Chiba University Japan as well as a Master in Landscape Architecture from Harvard.

The rest of the day will be spent on designing and constructing water features for a Japanese style garden. Presenter is Jim Lampi, a design-build landscaper specializing in the creation of ponds, waterfalls and naturalist landscapes.

Topics to be covered include: design considerations plus influences and inspirations for design. Also covered will be construction methods; comparing concrete, liner, hybrid concrete with liner; filtration; drainage; rock edging and plant edging; rocks and boulders: selection, acquisition, and placement using machine or sling.

Friday evening will offer guided tours of Shofuso Japanese House and Garden, refreshments and a presentation by Dr. Frank Chance, director of the Center for East Asian Studies at University of Pennsylvania.

Saturday’s events concentrate on koi: their origins, variety, and selection plus discussions of water conditions and creating a healthy environment. Also covered will be koi anatomy, reproduction, health and how to recognize illness, methods of treatment, feeding and seasonal considerations.

Joseph S. Zuritsky, owner of Quality Koi at Carney’s Point, NJ, with 40 years experience and numerous awards, will lead a tour of Nisei Koi Farm and deliver presentations on the above topics.

To make reservations, contact NAJGA by e-mail to KYanagi@NAJGA.ORG or telephone (503) 222-1194. You may also click on the link below to print out a registration form for for information, fees, hotel registration and mailing information.

Click to access Philadelphia%20Workshop%20Information%20and%20Registration%20Form%20%281%29.pdf

If you wish to learn more about Shofuso Japanese House and Garden, visit their web site:

http://www.shofuso.com/

or find them on FaceBook.

new hornbeam hedge

A new hornbeam hedge separates the entry paths at Shofuso and guides visitors to the tour booth.

Francis Weng discusses pond biology and maintenance. (photo by Bill F. Eger)

Francis Weng discusses pond biology and maintenance.
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

JimLampl-2-Shofuso

Jim Lampl

Jim Lampl discusses pond construction.
(photo by Bill Eger)

Jizo

Tucked away in the bamboo just uphill from a koi feeding station at the pond

Dr. Goto

Dr. Seiko Goto discusses the history of water in Japanese gardens at the NAJGA regional conference in Philadelphia.
(photo by Bill Eger)

class photo

The class photo of garden folk who attended the NAJGA regional conference in Philadelphia.
(photo by Bill Eger)

Categories: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Carpentry workshop in August in California

http://hosted.verticalresponse.com/1212645/9000fefe1e/546429619/3550f8d2c0/

The North American Japanese Garden Association will present Japanese Woodworking Skills using Traditional Hand Tools in Oakland, California, August 13-16.

Lectures, 20 hours of shop time and tours are all part of this intense session.

For more information and to register see the flyer above or go to www.najga.org/events

 Due to shop space limitations, registration for the Japanese Woodworking Using Traditional Hand Tools is limited.  Registrations will be processed on a First Come, First Served basis.  NAJGA reserves the right to close registration once the limited number of spots are filled. 
For questions or more information, 
call 503-222-1194 or email info@najga.org
A visit to Hida Tool is part of a tour during this conference…a place of wonder and quality.
Here is a link to their store if you wish a virtual visit!
Hida Tool
 inside Hida Tool 2inside Hida Tool
Categories: California, Oakland | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Enthusiastic Denver garden curator tours Hilo’s Lili`uokalani Gardens

On Saturday, May 18, the board of directors of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens welcomed Ebi Kondo, curator of Sho-Fu-En the Japanese garden at Denver Botanic Gardens and a board member of the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA), to Hilo’s bayfront park along with several Hilo community leaders with long-time ties to the garden.

Ebi Kondo, curator of Sho-Fu-En at the Denver Botanic Gardens
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

Kondo was enthusiastic about Lili`uokalani Gardens. “This is an old-style pleasure garden,” he said. “You have so much history here. This is a great event  to be shared with all who visit.

“There is such a good feeling to this garden, both casual and elegant. I see a welcome, peaceful, casual, approachable, carefree environment. This is a great combination of American-Japanese garden with Hilo Hawaii flavor.”

Ebi Kondo of Sho-Fu-En Japanese Garden in Denver Colorado explains the benefits of membership in a public garden organization. Nearby are Friends of Lili`uokalani members Harvey Tajiri and K.T. Cannon-Eger.

Ebi Kondo of Sho-Fu-En Japanese Garden in Denver Colorado explains the benefits of membership in NAJGA a non-profit public garden organization. Nearby are Friends of Lili`uokalani members Harvey Tajiri and K.T. Cannon-Eger.
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

Kondo worked on the revitalization of the Japanese garden in Denver. “It takes everybody working together,” he said.

Sho-Fu-En now features a new roji (dewy garden path) to the tea house as well as a separate ADA compliant path. The tea house in Denver is like the one in Hilo in one respect: there are two areas for practitioners and participants — one more traditional with tatami floor and one Western with folding chairs.

Della Allison Yamashiro of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens, listens to Hiroshi Suga, president of the Japanese Community Association of Hawaii, speak of cooperation to promote and preserve Japanese culture and foster harmony and fellowship in Hawaii County.

Della Allison Yamashiro of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens, listens to Hiroshi Suga, president of the Japanese Community Association of Hawaii, speak of cooperation to promote and preserve Japanese culture, and foster harmony and fellowship in Hawaii County.
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

Russ Oda speaks of Shoroan and the history of Urasenke in Hawaii.

Russ Oda speaks of Shoroan and the history of Urasenke in Hawaii.
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

Kondo also was enthusiastic about the role of public gardens in communities. “To me, garden is a place to make memories. Happy people come here and are more happy. Sad people who come here are lifted.”

The casual tour wandered over to shade by the bamboo grove..

The casual tour wandered over to shade by the bamboo grove.
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

Dwayne Mukai, president of Kumamoto Kenjin Kai, and Rev. Jeffrey Soga, Rimban for Hawaii Island's Hongwanji join in the conversation. (photo by Bill F. Eger)

Dwayne Mukai, president of Kumamoto Kenjin Kai, and Rev. Jeffrey Soga, Rimban for Hawaii Island’s Hongwanji join in the conversation.
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

KT&Ebi-Basin-5577

K.T. Cannon-Eger, Ebi Kondo and Philippe Nault ponder an ancient stone basin.
(photo by Bill F. Eger)

Sho-Fu-En at Denver Botanic Gardens is one of the leadership gardens in the formation of the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA). Kondo took time to emphasize to the group the importance of sharing information. “There will come a time when you have a question and you need to find resources. That is the reason we have this association of public gardens…to be of help to each other with workshops on horticulture, stonescaping, pond building, fund raising, message presentation and all of the things you will face.”

NAJGA offers two regional conferences later this year. Woodworking skills and traditional hand tools will be held August 13-16 in Oakland, California with site visits to several gardens in the area. Constructing Japanese water features and selection and care of koi will be held September 20-21 at Shofuso in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Registration is open now for the woodworking conference in Oakland. More details on the regional conference in Pennsylvania will be available in July. Go to the NAJGA web site for further information. http://www.najga.org

For additional stories in this blog on Denver or NAJGA, check the category and tag lists to the right side of the screen.

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Categories: California, Colorado, Denver, Hawaii, Hilo, Oakland, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

First NAJGA Journal published

The first issue of the Journal of the North American Japanese Garden Association

The first issue of the Journal of the North American Japanese Garden Association features a view of the tea deck at Sho-Fu-En in Denver Botanic Gardens.
photo by Bill F. Eger

The first issue of The Journal of the North American Japanese Garden Association arrived in our mailbox the other day and it’s gorgeous! Within heavy cover stock are more than 60 pages of well written, beautifully illustrated articles.

Topics in this inaugural edition include an extensive article by Robert Karr on The Garden of the Phoenix in Chicago — which article has been translated into Japanese. The story celebrates the 120-year history of the garden and looks toward the future with plans for mass plantings of cherry trees in the lagoon nearby.

It is followed by a detailed account of a garden now gone: Middlegate Japanese Gardens of Pass Christian, Mississippi by landscape architect Anne Legett.

As Journal editor Kendall Brown points out, “The former garden’s bright future and the latter’s forlorn state signal the fragility of gardens and the need for careful stewardship.”

Six regional gardens — Birmingham, Alabama; Huntington Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California; Kumamoto-en in San Antonio, Texas; Sho-Fu-En in Denver, Colorado, the Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden on the campus of California State University Long Beach and Portland Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon — offer comparative and contrasting views on several questions surrounding the topic of master planning. NAJGA executive director Diana Lawroe analyzed results of questions, interviews and documents, pulling together a cogent and insightful article.

A Living Friendship of Flowers details horticultural challenges in observing the centennial of the Japan-U.S. Cherry Blossom Gift. Case studies include Chicago Botanic Garden, Fort Worth Botanic Garden, and Waimea Hawaii.

An article on interpretive education offers case studies on docent tours, ephemeral and permanent signs, and new technologies such as cell phone guides.

Jill Raggett, Ph.D., is a specialist in the emergence of Japanese style gardens in the British Isles, historic garden restoration, and biographies for the Japan Society. This distinguished speaker offers her view of the first conference of NAJGA — Connections — held October 2012 in Denver, Colorado.

Finally there is a book review of a reprint of the 1940 work by America’s first Japanese garden expert Loraine E. Kuck, well known to Hawaii garden folk for her books and garden designs here. Miyuki Katahita-Manabe, Ph.D., of Osaka notes in her review: “The reprinting in 2012 of Loraine Kuck’s The Art of Japanese Gardens, first published in 1940, provides an opportunity for reassessing this important book that introduced many English-language readers to the cultural history of Japanese gardens.”

The Journal is a benefit of NAJGA membership. It was made possible through the support of The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership. Japanese language translation service were provided by Matsuda, Funai, Eifert & Mitchell, Ltd.

NAJGA is a professional non-profit membership organization dedicated to the advancement and sustainability of Japanese gardens throughout the United States and Canada. Founded in 2011 with input from more than 200 Japanese garden professionals, NAJGA focuses on the Horticulture, Human Culture, and Business Culture of Japanese gardens through a variety of programs and services. NAJGA membership is open to everyone.

For more information, go to http://www.najga.org

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Cover photo for The Journal by Bill F. Eger. Comments on this and other articles in this blog are welcome.

Categories: Alabama, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Texas | Tags: , | 1 Comment

Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America arrives on bookshelves worldwide

cover photo by David Cobb of the hexagonal yukimi style lantern at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle

cover photo by David Cobb of the hexagonal yukimi style lantern at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle

A new look at Japanese gardens in North America — Quiet Beauty — provides the viewing public with detailed information and delightful photographs on 26 peaceful places across the continental United States and into Canada.

Author Kendall H. Brown is a professor of Asian art history at California State University Long Beach. Photographer David M. Cobb is a member of the North American Nature Photography Association, Garden Writers Association, and Professional Photographers of America.

Released by the esteemed publishing house Tuttle Publishing, this beautiful book offers history and invites thoughtfulness on how these gardens came to be and what they offer to us now. Insightful text is accompanied by more than 180 stunning color photographs and a few reproductions of antique postal cards.

In the introduction — Places to Dream — Dr. Brown notes, “Japanese gardens or, more accurately, Japanese-style gardens, in North America offer distinct pleasures. In contrast to the cacophony of cities, the anonymity of suburbs, and even the anxiety of deserts or forests, these gardens can provide beautifully controlled environments. In artful landscapes we lose ourselves in a path woven around a pond and a harmonious stone arrangement; we delight in the variegated colors of graceful koi and the bright hues of blossoming plums; and we are calmed by a stream’s gentle murmur and the dappled greens of moss. Another kind of pleasure is contextual and social rather than sensory and psychological. Japanese gardens in North America are often found where we least expect them, and in places unknown in pre-modern Japan. Thus we feel a special delight in discovering a ‘dry garden’ of stones and sand at a museum, a lush pond garden on a college campus, or a waterfall-fed stream garden in a hospital. Those familiar with gardens in Japan may also enjoy Japanese-style gardens intellectually, noting creative plant substitutions or thoughtful ways of interpreting Japanese design principles within distinctly North American spaces.”

Dr. Brown takes three eras posited by garden historian Makoto Suzuki of the Nodai Institute, professor at Tokyo University of Agriculture, and expands them to five: the age of world fairs and expositions, building bridges, innovation by adaptation, expansive visions and traditions transformed.

During the past ten years. I have read many articles by Ken Brown and have heard him speak at several conferences. I serve on the editorial board of the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA) which editorial board he chairs. In person, I can verify that Dr. Brown delivers a substantial amount of information in a short amount of time — all of it masterfully accompanied by photographs, post cards, newspaper clippings and other visual aids along with a good sense of humor and split second timing. There are times I have felt he is delivering information faster than I can absorb it so I am delighted to have such a beautiful volume I can savor at leisure.

I have a special appreciation for David Cobb’s photographs. My husband and I have been to many of the places depicted and know what it takes to get the perfect image of that spot. So many of Cobb’s shots are truly breathtaking.

back cover photo by David Cobb of the Japanese garden at Fort Worth Botanic Garden in Texas

back cover photo by David Cobb of the Japanese garden at Fort Worth Botanic Garden in Texas

Gardens featured in Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America are:

the Japanese Tea Garden in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco California 1894;

Japanese Garden at the Huntington Botanic Garden, San Marino California 1911 (also 1968, 2011);

Maymont Japanese Garden, Richmond Virginia, 1911 (1977);

Japanese Hill and Pond Garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, New York 1915;

Hakone Estate and Garden, Saratoga California 1918;

Shofuso Japanese House and Garden, Philadelphia Pennsylvania 1958;

Japanese Garden at the Washington Park Arboretum, Seattle Washington 1960;

Nitobe Memorial Garden at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver B.C. Canada 1960;

Japanese Garden at the Blodel Reserve, Bainbridge Island, Washington 1961 (1978, 1986);

Portland Japanese Garden, Portland Oregon 1963;

Japanese Garden in San Mateo Central Park, San Mateo California 1965;

Nikka-Yuko Japanese Garden, Lethbridge, Alberta 1966;

Nishinomiya Garden in Mani to Park, Spokane Washington 1974;

Japanese Garden in the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, Fort Worth Texas 1973;

Shomu’en at Cheekwood, Nashville Tennessee 1990;

Seiwa’en at the Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis Missouri 1977;

Sansho’en at Chicago Botanic Garden, Glencoe Illinois 1982;

Shofu’en at the Denver Botanic Gardens, Denver Colorado 1979;

Suiho’en at the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant, Van Nuys California 1984;

Seisuitei at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chanhassen Minnesota 1985 (1996);

Anderson Japanese Gardens, Rockford Illinois 1978;

Japanese Garden at the Montreal Botanical Garden, Montreal Quebec 1988;

Tenshin’en at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Massachusetts 1988;

Roji’en in the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach Florida 2001;

R0ho’en in Margaret T. Hance Park, Phoenix Arizona 2002; and

Garden of the Pine Wind at Garven Woodland Gardens, Hot Springs Arkansas 2001.

Marvelous additions in the appendices include garden contacts and a select bibliography including books, journals and websites plus a listing of 75 important Japanese gardens in North America, five of which are in the state of Hawaii.

The Hawaii gardens appearing in this list include:

the Cultural Gardens at Honolulu International Airport 1967;

Imin (East West) Center at the University of Hawaii-Manoa 1963 (teahouse 1972);

Byodo’in Gardens, Kaneohe Oahu 1968;

Japanese Garden and Teahouse at Kepaniwai Park, Wailuku Maui 1968 (teahouse 1972); and

Lili`uokalani Gardens, Hilo Hawai`i (1917).

December 17, 1944 from the library of the Hawaiian Historical Society

Lili`uokalani Gardens on December 17, 1944 from the library of the Hawaiian Historical Society in Honolulu

For more information on Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America and other books available from Tuttle Publishing, please consult the web site

http://wwwtuttlepublishing.com

DSCF4948

For more information on the North American Japanese Garden Association, please consult the web site:

http://www.najga.com

Categories: Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Missouri, Texas | Tags: , , , , | 5 Comments

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